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Article: Saving two birds with one stone: solving the quandary of introduced, threatened species

TitleSaving two birds with one stone: solving the quandary of introduced, threatened species
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherEcological Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersinecology.org/
Citation
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 2017 How to Cite?
AbstractThe international wildlife trade has spread numerous species across the planet and reduced populations of many of these same species in their native ranges. In some cases, the intentional or accidental release of traded organisms has led to the establishment of populations beyond their native ranges, in urban centers or adjacent wilderness and often with negative environmental consequences. Here, we describe examples of the conservation dilemma posed by introduced, threatened species and highlight ways to mitigate the threats presented by introduced populations – as well as the threats facing native populations – of the same species. Managing introduced populations – either by using them as substitutes to help offset the demand for wild-caught organisms or by translocating them in an effort to reinforce imperiled populations within their native ranges – represents a currently underutilized solution to two pressing conservation problems. Alternatively, naturalized populations could serve as research surrogates to facilitate an understanding of the natural history of the species in its native range. Such creative conservation strategies could help stem the continuing worldwide degradation of biodiversity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/232871
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.504
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.205

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGibson, LG-
dc.contributor.authorYong, DL-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T05:33:04Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-20T05:33:04Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 2017-
dc.identifier.issn1540-9295-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/232871-
dc.description.abstractThe international wildlife trade has spread numerous species across the planet and reduced populations of many of these same species in their native ranges. In some cases, the intentional or accidental release of traded organisms has led to the establishment of populations beyond their native ranges, in urban centers or adjacent wilderness and often with negative environmental consequences. Here, we describe examples of the conservation dilemma posed by introduced, threatened species and highlight ways to mitigate the threats presented by introduced populations – as well as the threats facing native populations – of the same species. Managing introduced populations – either by using them as substitutes to help offset the demand for wild-caught organisms or by translocating them in an effort to reinforce imperiled populations within their native ranges – represents a currently underutilized solution to two pressing conservation problems. Alternatively, naturalized populations could serve as research surrogates to facilitate an understanding of the natural history of the species in its native range. Such creative conservation strategies could help stem the continuing worldwide degradation of biodiversity.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherEcological Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersinecology.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Ecology and the Environment-
dc.rightsFrontiers in Ecology and the Environment. Copyright © Ecological Society of America.-
dc.rightsCopyright by the Ecological Society of America, along with the full citation-
dc.titleSaving two birds with one stone: solving the quandary of introduced, threatened species-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailGibson, LG: lgibson@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityGibson, LG=rp01958-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/fee.1449-
dc.identifier.hkuros263506-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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