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Article: Enemies with benefits: parasitic endoliths protect mussels against heat stress

TitleEnemies with benefits: parasitic endoliths protect mussels against heat stress
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherNature Publishing Group: Open Access Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html
Citation
Scientific Reports, 2016, v. 6, p. article no. 31413 How to Cite?
AbstractPositive and negative aspects of species interactions can be context dependant and strongly affected by environmental conditions. We tested the hypothesis that, during periods of intense heat stress, parasitic phototrophic endoliths that fatally degrade mollusc shells can benefit their mussel hosts. Endolithic infestation significantly reduced body temperatures of sun-exposed mussels and, during unusually extreme heat stress, parasitised individuals suffered lower mortality rates than non-parasitised hosts. This beneficial effect was related to the white discolouration caused by the excavation activity of endoliths. Under climate warming, species relationships may be drastically realigned and conditional benefits of phototrophic endolithic parasites may become more important than the costs of infestation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/232824
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.228
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZardi, GI-
dc.contributor.authorNicastro, KR-
dc.contributor.authorMcQuaid, CD-
dc.contributor.authorNg, PT-
dc.contributor.authorLathlean, JA-
dc.contributor.authorSeuront, L-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T05:32:41Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-20T05:32:41Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2016, v. 6, p. article no. 31413-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/232824-
dc.description.abstractPositive and negative aspects of species interactions can be context dependant and strongly affected by environmental conditions. We tested the hypothesis that, during periods of intense heat stress, parasitic phototrophic endoliths that fatally degrade mollusc shells can benefit their mussel hosts. Endolithic infestation significantly reduced body temperatures of sun-exposed mussels and, during unusually extreme heat stress, parasitised individuals suffered lower mortality rates than non-parasitised hosts. This beneficial effect was related to the white discolouration caused by the excavation activity of endoliths. Under climate warming, species relationships may be drastically realigned and conditional benefits of phototrophic endolithic parasites may become more important than the costs of infestation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group: Open Access Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleEnemies with benefits: parasitic endoliths protect mussels against heat stress-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailNg, PT: tptng@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep31413-
dc.identifier.hkuros265483-
dc.identifier.volume6-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 31413-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 31413-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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