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Conference Paper: Evaluation of cognitive function by electrophysiological study in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with previous neuropsychiatric involvement

TitleEvaluation of cognitive function by electrophysiological study in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with previous neuropsychiatric involvement
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/
Citation
The 21st Medical Research Conference (MRC 2016), Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, 16 January 2016. In Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2016, v. 22 suppl. 1, p. 56, abstract no. 94 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Previous studies on cognitive dysfunction evaluated by electrophysiological test in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who had previous neuropsychiatric involvement (NPSLE) were inconsistent. This study aimed to evaluate P300 as an electrophysiological marker of cognitive function in NPSLE patients who were diagnosed to have cognitive impairment by standard neuropsychological tests. METHODS: Event-related potentials were assessed by the auditory and visual oddball paradigms. Amplitude and latency of P300 at the frontal (Fz), central (Cz), and parietal (Pz) regions were determined and compared to controls. RESULTS: Sixteen patients with previous NPSLE were identified to have cognitive impairment, defined as one or more tests below 2 standard deviations of demographically normative data, among 20 patients recruited for comprehensive neuropsychological tests. P300 detection was performed in NPSLE patients with cognitive impairment (n=9), matched SLE patients without previous NPSLE (non-NPSLE; n=9), and healthy controls (n=15). Auditory oddball task did not show any P300 abnormality between groups. Visual oddball task revealed reduced amplitude of P300 over Fz (P=0.002) and Cz (P=0.009) electrodes in NPSLE patients compared to healthy controls and among those who had predominant memory deficit (P=0.01 at Fz). Abnormal P300 was also observed in non-NPSLE patients at Fz and Cz. CONCLUSION: P300 elicited by auditory oddball paradigm was not a sensitive electrophysiological marker for cognitive impairment in NPSLE patients. Using visual oddball paradigm, abnormal P300 was found in NPSLE patients over Fz and Pz regions compared to normal controls but was not discriminative from possible subclinical disease in non-NPSLE patients.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/232500
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGao, Y-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, RTF-
dc.contributor.authorGao, JL-
dc.contributor.authorLau, EYY-
dc.contributor.authorWan, HY-
dc.contributor.authorMok, MYT-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T05:30:27Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-20T05:30:27Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe 21st Medical Research Conference (MRC 2016), Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, 16 January 2016. In Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2016, v. 22 suppl. 1, p. 56, abstract no. 94-
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/232500-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Previous studies on cognitive dysfunction evaluated by electrophysiological test in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who had previous neuropsychiatric involvement (NPSLE) were inconsistent. This study aimed to evaluate P300 as an electrophysiological marker of cognitive function in NPSLE patients who were diagnosed to have cognitive impairment by standard neuropsychological tests. METHODS: Event-related potentials were assessed by the auditory and visual oddball paradigms. Amplitude and latency of P300 at the frontal (Fz), central (Cz), and parietal (Pz) regions were determined and compared to controls. RESULTS: Sixteen patients with previous NPSLE were identified to have cognitive impairment, defined as one or more tests below 2 standard deviations of demographically normative data, among 20 patients recruited for comprehensive neuropsychological tests. P300 detection was performed in NPSLE patients with cognitive impairment (n=9), matched SLE patients without previous NPSLE (non-NPSLE; n=9), and healthy controls (n=15). Auditory oddball task did not show any P300 abnormality between groups. Visual oddball task revealed reduced amplitude of P300 over Fz (P=0.002) and Cz (P=0.009) electrodes in NPSLE patients compared to healthy controls and among those who had predominant memory deficit (P=0.01 at Fz). Abnormal P300 was also observed in non-NPSLE patients at Fz and Cz. CONCLUSION: P300 elicited by auditory oddball paradigm was not a sensitive electrophysiological marker for cognitive impairment in NPSLE patients. Using visual oddball paradigm, abnormal P300 was found in NPSLE patients over Fz and Pz regions compared to normal controls but was not discriminative from possible subclinical disease in non-NPSLE patients.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journal-
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.titleEvaluation of cognitive function by electrophysiological study in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with previous neuropsychiatric involvement-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, RTF: rtcheung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailGao, JL: galeng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, EYY: eyylau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMok, MYT: temy@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, RTF=rp00434-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, EYY=rp00634-
dc.identifier.authorityMok, MYT=rp00490-
dc.identifier.hkuros266717-
dc.identifier.volume22-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage56, abstract no. 94-
dc.identifier.epage56, abstract no. 94-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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