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Conference Paper: The relationship between total bilirubin levels and total mortality in older adults: the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004

TitleThe relationship between total bilirubin levels and total mortality in older adults: the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/
Citation
The 20th Medical Research Conference (MRC 2015), Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, 17 January 2015. In Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2015, v. 21 suppl. 1, p. 44, abstract no. 69 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Due to its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, bilirubin has been associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. A recent study demonstrated an L-shaped association of pre-treatment total bilirubin levels with total mortality in a statin-treated cohort. We therefore investigated the association of total bilirubin levels with total mortality in a nationally representative sample of older adults from the general population. METHODS: A total of 4303 participants aged ≥60 years from the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004 with mortality data followed up through 31 December 2006 were included in this analysis, with a mean follow-up period of 4.5 years. RESULTS: Participants with total bilirubin levels of 0.1-0.4 mg/dL had the highest mortality rate (19.8%). Compared with participants with total bilirubin levels of 0.5-0.7 mg/dL and in a multivariable regression model, a lower total bilirubin level of 0.1-0.4 mg/dL was associated with higher risk of total mortality (hazard ratio [HR]=1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.72; P=0.012), while higher levels (≥0.8 mg/dL) also tended to be associated with higher risk of total mortality, but this did not reach statistical significance (HR=1.24; 95% CI, 0.98-1.56; P=0.072). CONCLUSION: In this nationally representative sample of older adults, the association of total bilirubin levels with total mortality was the highest among those with a level between 0.1 and 0.4 mg/dL. Further studies are needed to investigate whether higher total bilirubin levels could be associated with a higher mortality risk, compared to a level of 0.5-0.7 mg/dL.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/232421
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.279

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOng, KL-
dc.contributor.authorAllison, MA-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY-
dc.contributor.authorWu, BJ-
dc.contributor.authorBarter, PJ-
dc.contributor.authorRye, KA-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T05:29:51Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-20T05:29:51Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 20th Medical Research Conference (MRC 2015), Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, 17 January 2015. In Hong Kong Medical Journal, 2015, v. 21 suppl. 1, p. 44, abstract no. 69-
dc.identifier.issn1024-2708-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/232421-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Due to its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, bilirubin has been associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. A recent study demonstrated an L-shaped association of pre-treatment total bilirubin levels with total mortality in a statin-treated cohort. We therefore investigated the association of total bilirubin levels with total mortality in a nationally representative sample of older adults from the general population. METHODS: A total of 4303 participants aged ≥60 years from the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004 with mortality data followed up through 31 December 2006 were included in this analysis, with a mean follow-up period of 4.5 years. RESULTS: Participants with total bilirubin levels of 0.1-0.4 mg/dL had the highest mortality rate (19.8%). Compared with participants with total bilirubin levels of 0.5-0.7 mg/dL and in a multivariable regression model, a lower total bilirubin level of 0.1-0.4 mg/dL was associated with higher risk of total mortality (hazard ratio [HR]=1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.72; P=0.012), while higher levels (≥0.8 mg/dL) also tended to be associated with higher risk of total mortality, but this did not reach statistical significance (HR=1.24; 95% CI, 0.98-1.56; P=0.072). CONCLUSION: In this nationally representative sample of older adults, the association of total bilirubin levels with total mortality was the highest among those with a level between 0.1 and 0.4 mg/dL. Further studies are needed to investigate whether higher total bilirubin levels could be associated with a higher mortality risk, compared to a level of 0.5-0.7 mg/dL.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherHong Kong Academy of Medicine Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkmj.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Medical Journal-
dc.rightsHong Kong Medical Journal. Copyright © Hong Kong Academy of Medicine Press.-
dc.titleThe relationship between total bilirubin levels and total mortality in older adults: the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailOng, KL: okl2000@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321-
dc.identifier.hkuros265117-
dc.identifier.volume21-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage44, abstract no. 69-
dc.identifier.epage44, abstract no. 69-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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