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Article: Lumbar intervertebral disc allograft transplantation: long-term mobility and impact on the adjacent segments

TitleLumbar intervertebral disc allograft transplantation: long-term mobility and impact on the adjacent segments
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/orthopedics/journal/586
Citation
European Spine Journal, 2017, v. 26 n. 3, p. 799-805 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: Fresh-frozen intervertebral disc (IVD) allograft transplantation has been successfully performed in the human cervical spine. Whether this non-fusion technology could truly decrease adjacent segment disease is still unknown. This study evaluated the long-term mobility of the IVD-transplanted segment and the impact on the adjacent spinal segments in a goat model. Methods: Twelve goats were used. IVD allograft transplantation was performed at lumbar L4/L5 in 5 goats; the other 7 goats were used as the untreated control (5) and for the supply of allografts (2). Post-operation lateral radiographs of the lumbar spine in the neutral, full-flexion and full-extension positions were taken at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Disc height (DH) of the allograft and the adjacent levels was calculated and range of motion (ROM) was measured using the Cobb’s method. The anatomy of the adjacent discs was observed histologically. Results: DH of the transplanted segment was decreased significantly after 3 months but no further reduction was recorded until the final follow-up. No obvious alteration was seen in the ROM of the transplanted segment at different time points with the ROM at 12 months being comparable to that of the untreated control. The DH and ROM in the adjacent segments were well maintained during the whole observation period. At post-operative 12 months, the ROM of the adjacent levels was similar to that of the untreated control and the anatomical morphology was well preserved. Conclusions: Lumbar IVD allograft transplantation in goats could restore the segmental mobility and did not negatively affect the adjacent segments after 12 months.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/231193
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.132
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.972

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, YC-
dc.contributor.authorXiao, J-
dc.contributor.authorLu, WW-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, VYL-
dc.contributor.authorHu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDK-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T05:21:20Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-20T05:21:20Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Spine Journal, 2017, v. 26 n. 3, p. 799-805-
dc.identifier.issn0940-6719-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/231193-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Fresh-frozen intervertebral disc (IVD) allograft transplantation has been successfully performed in the human cervical spine. Whether this non-fusion technology could truly decrease adjacent segment disease is still unknown. This study evaluated the long-term mobility of the IVD-transplanted segment and the impact on the adjacent spinal segments in a goat model. Methods: Twelve goats were used. IVD allograft transplantation was performed at lumbar L4/L5 in 5 goats; the other 7 goats were used as the untreated control (5) and for the supply of allografts (2). Post-operation lateral radiographs of the lumbar spine in the neutral, full-flexion and full-extension positions were taken at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Disc height (DH) of the allograft and the adjacent levels was calculated and range of motion (ROM) was measured using the Cobb’s method. The anatomy of the adjacent discs was observed histologically. Results: DH of the transplanted segment was decreased significantly after 3 months but no further reduction was recorded until the final follow-up. No obvious alteration was seen in the ROM of the transplanted segment at different time points with the ROM at 12 months being comparable to that of the untreated control. The DH and ROM in the adjacent segments were well maintained during the whole observation period. At post-operative 12 months, the ROM of the adjacent levels was similar to that of the untreated control and the anatomical morphology was well preserved. Conclusions: Lumbar IVD allograft transplantation in goats could restore the segmental mobility and did not negatively affect the adjacent segments after 12 months.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/orthopedics/journal/586-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Spine Journal-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-016-4535-z-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License-
dc.titleLumbar intervertebral disc allograft transplantation: long-term mobility and impact on the adjacent segments-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHuang, YC: huangyc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLu, WW: wwlu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, VYL: vicleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHu, Y: yhud@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK: hrmoldk@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLu, WW=rp00411-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, VYL=rp01764-
dc.identifier.authorityHu, Y=rp00432-
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00586-016-4535-z-
dc.identifier.hkuros263923-
dc.identifier.volume26-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage799-
dc.identifier.epage805-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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