File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Regional and temporal characteristics of bovine tuberculosis of cattle in Great Britain

TitleRegional and temporal characteristics of bovine tuberculosis of cattle in Great Britain
Authors
KeywordsSpatio-temporal epidemiology
Cattle infections
Geographic analysis
Mycobacterium bovis
Public data analysis
Time series decomposition
Issue Date2016
Citation
Stochastic Environmental Research and Risk Assessment, 2016, v. 30, n. 3, p. 989-1003 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2015, The Author(s).Bovine tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic disease in cattle that causes a serious food security challenge to the agricultural industry in terms of dairy and meat production. Spatio-temporal disease analysis in terms of time trends and geographic disparities of disease dynamics can provide useful insights into the overall efficiency of control efforts as well as the relative efficiency of different management measures towards eradication. In GB, Scotland has had a risk based surveillance testing policy under which high risk herds are tested frequently, and in September 2009 was officially declared as TB free. Wales have had an annual or more frequent testing policy for all cattle herds since January 2010, while in England several herds are still tested every 4 years except some high TB prevalence areas where annual testing is applied. Time series analysis using publicly available data for total tests on herds, total cattle slaughtered, new herd incidents, and herds not TB free, were analysed globally for GB and locally for the constituent regions of Wales, Scotland, West, North, and East England. After detecting trends over time, underlying regional differences were compared with the testing policies in the region. Total cattle slaughtered are decreasing in Wales, Scotland and West England, but increasing in the North and East English regions. New herd incidents, i.e., disease incidence, are decreasing in Wales, Scotland, West English region, but increasing in North and East English regions. Herds not TB free, i.e., disease prevalence, are increasing in West, North, and East English regions, while they are decreasing in Wales and Scotland. Total cattle slaughtered were positively correlated with total tests in the West, North, and East English regions, with high slopes of regression indicating that additional testing is likely to facilitate the eradication of the disease. There was no correlation between total cattle slaughtered and total tests on herds in Wales indicating that herds are tested frequent enough in order to detect all likely cases and so control TB. The main conclusion of the analysis conducted here is that more frequent testing is leading to lower TB infections in cattle both in terms of TB prevalence as well as TB incidence.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/231021
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.237
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.065

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMoustakas, Aristides-
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Matthew R.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:24Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:24Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationStochastic Environmental Research and Risk Assessment, 2016, v. 30, n. 3, p. 989-1003-
dc.identifier.issn1436-3240-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/231021-
dc.description.abstract© 2015, The Author(s).Bovine tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic disease in cattle that causes a serious food security challenge to the agricultural industry in terms of dairy and meat production. Spatio-temporal disease analysis in terms of time trends and geographic disparities of disease dynamics can provide useful insights into the overall efficiency of control efforts as well as the relative efficiency of different management measures towards eradication. In GB, Scotland has had a risk based surveillance testing policy under which high risk herds are tested frequently, and in September 2009 was officially declared as TB free. Wales have had an annual or more frequent testing policy for all cattle herds since January 2010, while in England several herds are still tested every 4 years except some high TB prevalence areas where annual testing is applied. Time series analysis using publicly available data for total tests on herds, total cattle slaughtered, new herd incidents, and herds not TB free, were analysed globally for GB and locally for the constituent regions of Wales, Scotland, West, North, and East England. After detecting trends over time, underlying regional differences were compared with the testing policies in the region. Total cattle slaughtered are decreasing in Wales, Scotland and West England, but increasing in the North and East English regions. New herd incidents, i.e., disease incidence, are decreasing in Wales, Scotland, West English region, but increasing in North and East English regions. Herds not TB free, i.e., disease prevalence, are increasing in West, North, and East English regions, while they are decreasing in Wales and Scotland. Total cattle slaughtered were positively correlated with total tests in the West, North, and East English regions, with high slopes of regression indicating that additional testing is likely to facilitate the eradication of the disease. There was no correlation between total cattle slaughtered and total tests on herds in Wales indicating that herds are tested frequent enough in order to detect all likely cases and so control TB. The main conclusion of the analysis conducted here is that more frequent testing is leading to lower TB infections in cattle both in terms of TB prevalence as well as TB incidence.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofStochastic Environmental Research and Risk Assessment-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectSpatio-temporal epidemiology-
dc.subjectCattle infections-
dc.subjectGeographic analysis-
dc.subjectMycobacterium bovis-
dc.subjectPublic data analysis-
dc.subjectTime series decomposition-
dc.titleRegional and temporal characteristics of bovine tuberculosis of cattle in Great Britain-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00477-015-1140-3-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84959216088-
dc.identifier.hkuros264002-
dc.identifier.volume30-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage989-
dc.identifier.epage1003-
dc.identifier.eissn1436-3259-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats