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Article: Executive control- and reward-related neural processes associated with the opportunity to engage in voluntary dishonest moral decision making

TitleExecutive control- and reward-related neural processes associated with the opportunity to engage in voluntary dishonest moral decision making
Authors
KeywordsMedial frontal negativity
Reward prediction error
Reward process
Moral decision making
Executive control
Issue Date2015
Citation
Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 2015, v. 15, n. 2, p. 475-491 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2015, Psychonomic Society, Inc.Research has begun to examine the neurocognitive processes underlying voluntary moral decision making, which involves engaging in honest or dishonest behavior in a setting in which the individual is free to make his or her own moral decisions. Employing event-related potentials, we measured executive control-related and reward-related neural processes during an incentivized coin-guessing task in which participants had the opportunity to voluntarily engage in dishonest behavior, by overreporting their wins to maximize earnings. We report four primary findings: First, the opportunity to deceive recruited executive control processes involving conflict monitoring and conflict resolution, as evidenced by a higher N2 and a smaller P3. Second, processing the outcome of the coin flips engaged reward-related processes, as evidenced by a larger medial feedback negativity (MFN) for incorrect (loss) than for correct (win) guesses, reflecting a reward prediction error signal. Third, elevated executive control-related neural activity reflecting conflict resolution (i.e., an attenuated executive control P3) predicted a greater likelihood of engaging in overall deceptive behavior. Finally, whereas elevated reward-related neural activity (the reward P3) was associated with a greater likelihood of engaging in overall deceptive behavior, an elevated reward prediction error signal (MFN difference score) predicted increased trial-by-trial moral behavioral adjustment (i.e., a greater likelihood to overreport wins following a previous honest loss than following a previous honest win trial). Collectively, these findings suggest that both executive control- and reward-related neural processes are implicated in moral decision making.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/231000
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.886
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.884

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xiaoqing-
dc.contributor.authorPornpattananangkul, Narun-
dc.contributor.authorNusslock, Robin-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:21Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:21Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationCognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 2015, v. 15, n. 2, p. 475-491-
dc.identifier.issn1530-7026-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/231000-
dc.description.abstract© 2015, Psychonomic Society, Inc.Research has begun to examine the neurocognitive processes underlying voluntary moral decision making, which involves engaging in honest or dishonest behavior in a setting in which the individual is free to make his or her own moral decisions. Employing event-related potentials, we measured executive control-related and reward-related neural processes during an incentivized coin-guessing task in which participants had the opportunity to voluntarily engage in dishonest behavior, by overreporting their wins to maximize earnings. We report four primary findings: First, the opportunity to deceive recruited executive control processes involving conflict monitoring and conflict resolution, as evidenced by a higher N2 and a smaller P3. Second, processing the outcome of the coin flips engaged reward-related processes, as evidenced by a larger medial feedback negativity (MFN) for incorrect (loss) than for correct (win) guesses, reflecting a reward prediction error signal. Third, elevated executive control-related neural activity reflecting conflict resolution (i.e., an attenuated executive control P3) predicted a greater likelihood of engaging in overall deceptive behavior. Finally, whereas elevated reward-related neural activity (the reward P3) was associated with a greater likelihood of engaging in overall deceptive behavior, an elevated reward prediction error signal (MFN difference score) predicted increased trial-by-trial moral behavioral adjustment (i.e., a greater likelihood to overreport wins following a previous honest loss than following a previous honest win trial). Collectively, these findings suggest that both executive control- and reward-related neural processes are implicated in moral decision making.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofCognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience-
dc.subjectMedial frontal negativity-
dc.subjectReward prediction error-
dc.subjectReward process-
dc.subjectMoral decision making-
dc.subjectExecutive control-
dc.titleExecutive control- and reward-related neural processes associated with the opportunity to engage in voluntary dishonest moral decision making-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/s13415-015-0336-9-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84939990719-
dc.identifier.volume15-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage475-
dc.identifier.epage491-

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