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Article: Unlearning implicit social biases during sleep

TitleUnlearning implicit social biases during sleep
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Science, 2015, v. 348, n. 6238, p. 1013-1015 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough people may endorse egalitarianism and tolerance, social biases can remain operative and drive harmful actions in an unconscious manner. Here, we investigated training to reduce implicit racial and gender bias. Forty participants processed counterstereotype information paired with one sound for each type of bias. Biases were reduced immediately after training. During subsequent slow-wave sleep, one sound was unobtrusively presented to each participant, repeatedly, to reactivate one type of training. Corresponding bias reductions were fortified in comparison with the social bias not externally reactivated during sleep. This advantage remained 1 week later, the magnitude of which was associated with time in slow-wave and rapid-eye-movement sleep after training. We conclude that memory reactivation during sleep enhances counterstereotype training and that maintaining a bias reduction is sleep-dependent.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230988
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 34.661
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 13.217

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xiaoqing-
dc.contributor.authorAntony, James W.-
dc.contributor.authorCreery, Jessica D.-
dc.contributor.authorVargas, Iliana M.-
dc.contributor.authorBodenhausen, Galen V.-
dc.contributor.authorPaller, Ken A.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:19Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:19Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationScience, 2015, v. 348, n. 6238, p. 1013-1015-
dc.identifier.issn0036-8075-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230988-
dc.description.abstractAlthough people may endorse egalitarianism and tolerance, social biases can remain operative and drive harmful actions in an unconscious manner. Here, we investigated training to reduce implicit racial and gender bias. Forty participants processed counterstereotype information paired with one sound for each type of bias. Biases were reduced immediately after training. During subsequent slow-wave sleep, one sound was unobtrusively presented to each participant, repeatedly, to reactivate one type of training. Corresponding bias reductions were fortified in comparison with the social bias not externally reactivated during sleep. This advantage remained 1 week later, the magnitude of which was associated with time in slow-wave and rapid-eye-movement sleep after training. We conclude that memory reactivation during sleep enhances counterstereotype training and that maintaining a bias reduction is sleep-dependent.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofScience-
dc.titleUnlearning implicit social biases during sleep-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/science.aaa3841-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84930675515-
dc.identifier.volume348-
dc.identifier.issue6238-
dc.identifier.spage1013-
dc.identifier.epage1015-
dc.identifier.eissn1095-9203-

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