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Article: Child loss and psychosis onset: Evidence for traumatic experience as an etiological factor in psychosis

TitleChild loss and psychosis onset: Evidence for traumatic experience as an etiological factor in psychosis
Authors
KeywordsPsychosis
Bereavement
Trauma
Child loss
Etiology
Life events
Schizophrenia
Issue Date2013
Citation
Psychiatry Research, 2013, v. 205, n. 1-2, p. 90-94 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious research suggests that trauma may contribute to psychosis onset. In this study, we examine the effect of parental loss of a child on the onset of psychotic experience using data from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, hypothesizing that child loss will precede the onset of psychosis and will be associated with a later age of onset. We likewise tested this association for six other psychiatric conditions to demonstrate specificity for psychosis. Individuals with a psychotic disorder who had lost a child had a significantly later age of onset, particularly in males, even when controlling for demographic variables and co-occurring substance abuse and psychiatric disorders. Psychosis onset frequently occurred within a year of child loss. No associations were found between child loss and onset of other psychiatric conditions, supporting specificity of the effect on psychosis. The presented findings implicate child loss as an etiological factor in the onset of psychosis, providing converging evidence with previous studies demonstrating associations between more widely studied trauma exposures (abuse, neglect, and assault) and psychosis. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230918
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.466
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.235

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDeVylder, Jordan E.-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Julia S H-
dc.contributor.authorOh, Hans Y.-
dc.contributor.authorLukens, Ellen P.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:09Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:09Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationPsychiatry Research, 2013, v. 205, n. 1-2, p. 90-94-
dc.identifier.issn0165-1781-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230918-
dc.description.abstractPrevious research suggests that trauma may contribute to psychosis onset. In this study, we examine the effect of parental loss of a child on the onset of psychotic experience using data from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, hypothesizing that child loss will precede the onset of psychosis and will be associated with a later age of onset. We likewise tested this association for six other psychiatric conditions to demonstrate specificity for psychosis. Individuals with a psychotic disorder who had lost a child had a significantly later age of onset, particularly in males, even when controlling for demographic variables and co-occurring substance abuse and psychiatric disorders. Psychosis onset frequently occurred within a year of child loss. No associations were found between child loss and onset of other psychiatric conditions, supporting specificity of the effect on psychosis. The presented findings implicate child loss as an etiological factor in the onset of psychosis, providing converging evidence with previous studies demonstrating associations between more widely studied trauma exposures (abuse, neglect, and assault) and psychosis. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychiatry Research-
dc.subjectPsychosis-
dc.subjectBereavement-
dc.subjectTrauma-
dc.subjectChild loss-
dc.subjectEtiology-
dc.subjectLife events-
dc.subjectSchizophrenia-
dc.titleChild loss and psychosis onset: Evidence for traumatic experience as an etiological factor in psychosis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychres.2012.08.008-
dc.identifier.pmid22939520-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84872612055-
dc.identifier.volume205-
dc.identifier.issue1-2-
dc.identifier.spage90-
dc.identifier.epage94-
dc.identifier.eissn1872-7123-

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