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Article: Mucosal melanoma of the head and neck: 32-year experience in a tertiary referral hospital

TitleMucosal melanoma of the head and neck: 32-year experience in a tertiary referral hospital
Authors
Keywordsmelanoma
head and neck mucosal melanoma
Mucosal melanoma
Issue Date2012
Citation
Laryngoscope, 2012, v. 122, n. 12, p. 2749-2753 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Primary mucosal melanomas of the head and neck (HNMM), albeit being rare, are rapidly lethal. Here we report the experience of patients with HNMM treated in our institution over a 32-year period. Objectives/Hypothesis: We aim to review our experience in managing HNMM patients over a 32-year period. Study Design: Retrospective study. Methods: Thirty-five patients diagnosed with HNMM from 1978 to 2009 were retrospectively reviewed, with an emphasis on predictors on survival outcome. Results: Twenty-four patients received curative resection, 6 of them followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. Neck dissections were performed in 8 patients. Four patients received radiotherapy as primary treatment. Seven patients were treated conservatively. The overall mean and median survivals were 50 and 26 months, respectively. The median survival of stage I, II, and III diseases in our group of patients were 39, 10, and 16 months, respectively. The 1-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 65.7% and 22.9%, respectively. Age above 60 (p = 0.007), nodal involvement (p = 0.047;) and stage at presentation (p = 0.046) were shown to be associated with worse overall survival. Sites of tumour did not seem to impact on survival. On multivariate analysis, only age (below or above 60) was found to be statistically significant [RR 4.79 (1.65-13.9), p = 0.004]. Conclusions: Oral cavity melanomas are more likely to have nodal involvement at presentation. Prognosis of HNMM remains grave. Current evidence still supports surgery as the best chance of cure. Role of adjuvant radiotherapy is controversial and does not appear to improve overall survival. Similarly, role of neck dissection is ill-defined. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230915
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.272
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.342

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Richie Chiu Lung-
dc.contributor.authorChan, Jimmy Yu Wai-
dc.contributor.authorWei, William Ignace-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:08Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationLaryngoscope, 2012, v. 122, n. 12, p. 2749-2753-
dc.identifier.issn0023-852X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230915-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Primary mucosal melanomas of the head and neck (HNMM), albeit being rare, are rapidly lethal. Here we report the experience of patients with HNMM treated in our institution over a 32-year period. Objectives/Hypothesis: We aim to review our experience in managing HNMM patients over a 32-year period. Study Design: Retrospective study. Methods: Thirty-five patients diagnosed with HNMM from 1978 to 2009 were retrospectively reviewed, with an emphasis on predictors on survival outcome. Results: Twenty-four patients received curative resection, 6 of them followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. Neck dissections were performed in 8 patients. Four patients received radiotherapy as primary treatment. Seven patients were treated conservatively. The overall mean and median survivals were 50 and 26 months, respectively. The median survival of stage I, II, and III diseases in our group of patients were 39, 10, and 16 months, respectively. The 1-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 65.7% and 22.9%, respectively. Age above 60 (p = 0.007), nodal involvement (p = 0.047;) and stage at presentation (p = 0.046) were shown to be associated with worse overall survival. Sites of tumour did not seem to impact on survival. On multivariate analysis, only age (below or above 60) was found to be statistically significant [RR 4.79 (1.65-13.9), p = 0.004]. Conclusions: Oral cavity melanomas are more likely to have nodal involvement at presentation. Prognosis of HNMM remains grave. Current evidence still supports surgery as the best chance of cure. Role of adjuvant radiotherapy is controversial and does not appear to improve overall survival. Similarly, role of neck dissection is ill-defined. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofLaryngoscope-
dc.subjectmelanoma-
dc.subjecthead and neck mucosal melanoma-
dc.subjectMucosal melanoma-
dc.titleMucosal melanoma of the head and neck: 32-year experience in a tertiary referral hospital-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/lary.23625-
dc.identifier.pmid23161468-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84871321775-
dc.identifier.hkuros215932-
dc.identifier.volume122-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage2749-
dc.identifier.epage2753-
dc.identifier.eissn1531-4995-

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