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Article: A repeated lie becomes a truth? The effect of intentional control and training on deception

TitleA repeated lie becomes a truth? The effect of intentional control and training on deception
Authors
KeywordsAutomaticity
Instruction
Training
Intentional control
Deception
Differentiation of deception paradigm
Issue Date2012
Citation
Frontiers in Psychology, 2012, v. 3, n. NOV How to Cite?
AbstractDeception has been demonstrated as a task that involves executive control such as conflict monitoring and response inhibition. In the present study, we investigated whether or not the controlled processes associated with deception could be trained to be more efficient. Forty-eight participants finished a reaction time-based differentiation of deception paradigm (DDP) task using selfand other-referential information on two occasions. After the first baseline DDP task, participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a control group in which participants finished the same task for a second time; an instruction group in which participants were instructed to speed up their deceptive responses in the second DDP; a training group in which participants received training in speeding up their deceptive responses, and then proceeded to the second DDP. Results showed that instruction alone significantly reduced the RTs associated with participants' deceptive responses. However, the differences between deceptive and truthful responses were erased only in the training group. The result suggests that the performance associated with deception is malleable and could be voluntarily controlled with intention or training. © 2012 Hu, Chen and Fu.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230912

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xiaoqing-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hao-
dc.contributor.authorFu, Genyue-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:08Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Psychology, 2012, v. 3, n. NOV-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230912-
dc.description.abstractDeception has been demonstrated as a task that involves executive control such as conflict monitoring and response inhibition. In the present study, we investigated whether or not the controlled processes associated with deception could be trained to be more efficient. Forty-eight participants finished a reaction time-based differentiation of deception paradigm (DDP) task using selfand other-referential information on two occasions. After the first baseline DDP task, participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a control group in which participants finished the same task for a second time; an instruction group in which participants were instructed to speed up their deceptive responses in the second DDP; a training group in which participants received training in speeding up their deceptive responses, and then proceeded to the second DDP. Results showed that instruction alone significantly reduced the RTs associated with participants' deceptive responses. However, the differences between deceptive and truthful responses were erased only in the training group. The result suggests that the performance associated with deception is malleable and could be voluntarily controlled with intention or training. © 2012 Hu, Chen and Fu.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Psychology-
dc.subjectAutomaticity-
dc.subjectInstruction-
dc.subjectTraining-
dc.subjectIntentional control-
dc.subjectDeception-
dc.subjectDifferentiation of deception paradigm-
dc.titleA repeated lie becomes a truth? The effect of intentional control and training on deception-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00488-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84870914208-
dc.identifier.volume3-
dc.identifier.issueNOV-
dc.identifier.spagenull-
dc.identifier.epagenull-
dc.identifier.eissn1664-1078-

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