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Article: Deception awareness improves P300-based deception detection in concealed information tests

TitleDeception awareness improves P300-based deception detection in concealed information tests
Authors
KeywordsEvent-related potentials
Psychophysiological detection of deception
P300
Lie detection
Guilty knowledge tests
Deception awareness
Credibility assessment
Concealed information tests
Issue Date2012
Citation
International Journal of Psychophysiology, 2012, v. 86, n. 1, p. 114-121 How to Cite?
AbstractWe asked if increased awareness of deception enhanced P300-based detection of concealed information with two groups: 1) Control subjects saw a randomized series of either rare probes (subject home towns), frequent irrelevants (other towns), and rare targets, which are irrelevant stimuli but requiring Button 1 responses. Probes and non-target irrelevants required Button 2 responses. Controls were told to be sure they performed target/non-target discrimination correctly, and were so reminded throughout the run. 2) Deception subjects received an identical stimulus series and response instructions, but were also alerted about their deception (pressing a non-recognition button to probes) before and throughout the run. The deception group had significantly greater differences between probe and irrelevant P300s than controls, as well as significantly greater individual detections (10/10) than did controls (5/10), suggesting that the deception awareness manipulation enhances test sensitivity. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230902
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.596
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.534

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRosenfeld, J. Peter-
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xiaoqing-
dc.contributor.authorPederson, Kristine-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:06Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:06Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Psychophysiology, 2012, v. 86, n. 1, p. 114-121-
dc.identifier.issn0167-8760-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230902-
dc.description.abstractWe asked if increased awareness of deception enhanced P300-based detection of concealed information with two groups: 1) Control subjects saw a randomized series of either rare probes (subject home towns), frequent irrelevants (other towns), and rare targets, which are irrelevant stimuli but requiring Button 1 responses. Probes and non-target irrelevants required Button 2 responses. Controls were told to be sure they performed target/non-target discrimination correctly, and were so reminded throughout the run. 2) Deception subjects received an identical stimulus series and response instructions, but were also alerted about their deception (pressing a non-recognition button to probes) before and throughout the run. The deception group had significantly greater differences between probe and irrelevant P300s than controls, as well as significantly greater individual detections (10/10) than did controls (5/10), suggesting that the deception awareness manipulation enhances test sensitivity. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Psychophysiology-
dc.subjectEvent-related potentials-
dc.subjectPsychophysiological detection of deception-
dc.subjectP300-
dc.subjectLie detection-
dc.subjectGuilty knowledge tests-
dc.subjectDeception awareness-
dc.subjectCredibility assessment-
dc.subjectConcealed information tests-
dc.titleDeception awareness improves P300-based deception detection in concealed information tests-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2012.06.007-
dc.identifier.pmid22750420-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867529546-
dc.identifier.volume86-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage114-
dc.identifier.epage121-
dc.identifier.eissn1872-7697-

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