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Article: Suicidal burn in Hong Kong

TitleSuicidal burn in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsCharcoal burning
Self-harm
Psychiatric illness
Issue Date2012
Citation
Burns, 2012, v. 38, n. 6, p. 937-941 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of our study is to review our experience in the management of patients who sustained burns associated with suicidal attempts over a 10-year period. In particular, we look into the outcome and incidence of self-harm/suicide after discharge among the survivors. Thirty-one patients with median age 36 years, ranging from 10 to 74, were included. Twenty-three (74%) were males and eight (26%) were females. Nearly three quarters (74%) of our patients had a known history of psychiatric illness: 11 had known history of substance abuse; 3 of them had drug-induced psychosis; 6 had schizophrenia; 5 had depression; 4 had personality disorders; 1 had pathological gambling and another one had adjustment disorder. Relationship problems and work/financial difficulties were the commonest reason for the suicidal attempts. Self-inflicted flame burn was the most frequent (39%; 12 patients) method of burning. Six patients (19%) died. The remaining 25 patients healed and were discharged. Seventeen patients required ICU care. The median length of stay in ICU was 7 days. The overall median length of stay was 35 days. The median follow up time for those survived is 63 months. Only 4 of these patients had further suicidal/parasuicidal attempts. Despite the high mortality, once these patients survived the initial injury, they are unlikely to commit suicide again. Thus, we believe that aggressive resuscitation should therefore be advocated for all suicidal burn patients. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230900
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.904
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.895

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, R. C.-
dc.contributor.authorBurd, A.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:06Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:06Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationBurns, 2012, v. 38, n. 6, p. 937-941-
dc.identifier.issn0305-4179-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230900-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of our study is to review our experience in the management of patients who sustained burns associated with suicidal attempts over a 10-year period. In particular, we look into the outcome and incidence of self-harm/suicide after discharge among the survivors. Thirty-one patients with median age 36 years, ranging from 10 to 74, were included. Twenty-three (74%) were males and eight (26%) were females. Nearly three quarters (74%) of our patients had a known history of psychiatric illness: 11 had known history of substance abuse; 3 of them had drug-induced psychosis; 6 had schizophrenia; 5 had depression; 4 had personality disorders; 1 had pathological gambling and another one had adjustment disorder. Relationship problems and work/financial difficulties were the commonest reason for the suicidal attempts. Self-inflicted flame burn was the most frequent (39%; 12 patients) method of burning. Six patients (19%) died. The remaining 25 patients healed and were discharged. Seventeen patients required ICU care. The median length of stay in ICU was 7 days. The overall median length of stay was 35 days. The median follow up time for those survived is 63 months. Only 4 of these patients had further suicidal/parasuicidal attempts. Despite the high mortality, once these patients survived the initial injury, they are unlikely to commit suicide again. Thus, we believe that aggressive resuscitation should therefore be advocated for all suicidal burn patients. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofBurns-
dc.subjectCharcoal burning-
dc.subjectSelf-harm-
dc.subjectPsychiatric illness-
dc.titleSuicidal burn in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.burns.2012.01.009-
dc.identifier.pmid22360959-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84864147607-
dc.identifier.volume38-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage937-
dc.identifier.epage941-
dc.identifier.eissn1879-1409-

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