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Article: Increasing the number of irrelevant stimuli increases ability to detect countermeasures to the P300-based Complex Trial Protocol for concealed information detection

TitleIncreasing the number of irrelevant stimuli increases ability to detect countermeasures to the P300-based Complex Trial Protocol for concealed information detection
Authors
KeywordsDeception detection
P300
Credibility assessment
Countermeasures
Concealed information test
Complex trial protocol
Issue Date2012
Citation
Psychophysiology, 2012, v. 49, n. 1, p. 85-95 How to Cite?
AbstractWe previously found that simultaneously executing a mental countermeasure and an explicit required response impairs reaction time (RT)-based detection of countermeasure use in a P300- based concealed information test. To address this issue, we increased the numbers of irrelevant stimuli to eight, and manipulated the proportions of to-be-countered irrelevant stimuli from 25% to 50% to 75% in three groups. Results: Based on P300 data, 100% of the simple guilty (no countermeasure use) and 92% of the innocent subjects were correctly identified as having or not having concealed information. In the countermeasure groups, detection rates varied from 71% to 92% across the different groups. Notably, in the present study with eight irrelevant items, simultaneous countermeasure use was indicated by elevated RT in the 50% and 75% countermeasure proportion groups, which it was not, previously, with 50% (two) countermeasures and four irrelevants. © 2011 Society for Psychophysiological Research.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230886
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.074
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.850

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xiaoqing-
dc.contributor.authorHegeman, Daniel-
dc.contributor.authorLandry, Elizabeth-
dc.contributor.authorRosenfeld, J. Peter-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-01T06:07:04Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-01T06:07:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationPsychophysiology, 2012, v. 49, n. 1, p. 85-95-
dc.identifier.issn0048-5772-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230886-
dc.description.abstractWe previously found that simultaneously executing a mental countermeasure and an explicit required response impairs reaction time (RT)-based detection of countermeasure use in a P300- based concealed information test. To address this issue, we increased the numbers of irrelevant stimuli to eight, and manipulated the proportions of to-be-countered irrelevant stimuli from 25% to 50% to 75% in three groups. Results: Based on P300 data, 100% of the simple guilty (no countermeasure use) and 92% of the innocent subjects were correctly identified as having or not having concealed information. In the countermeasure groups, detection rates varied from 71% to 92% across the different groups. Notably, in the present study with eight irrelevant items, simultaneous countermeasure use was indicated by elevated RT in the 50% and 75% countermeasure proportion groups, which it was not, previously, with 50% (two) countermeasures and four irrelevants. © 2011 Society for Psychophysiological Research.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychophysiology-
dc.subjectDeception detection-
dc.subjectP300-
dc.subjectCredibility assessment-
dc.subjectCountermeasures-
dc.subjectConcealed information test-
dc.subjectComplex trial protocol-
dc.titleIncreasing the number of irrelevant stimuli increases ability to detect countermeasures to the P300-based Complex Trial Protocol for concealed information detection-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1469-8986.2011.01286.x-
dc.identifier.pmid22091554-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-83455163790-
dc.identifier.volume49-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage85-
dc.identifier.epage95-
dc.identifier.eissn1469-8986-

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