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Article: Household Transmission of Influenza Virus

TitleHousehold Transmission of Influenza Virus
Authors
KeywordsInfluenza
Transmission
Control
Households
Public health
Issue Date2016
PublisherElsevier Ltd, Trends Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/tim
Citation
Trends in Microbiology, 2016, v. 24 n. 2, p. 123-133 How to Cite?
AbstractHuman influenza viruses cause regular epidemics and occasional pandemics with a substantial public health burden. Household transmission studies have provided valuable information on the dynamics of influenza transmission. We reviewed published studies and found that once one household member is infected with influenza, the risk of infection in a household contact can be up to 38%, and the delay between onset in index and secondary cases is around 3 days. Younger age was associated with higher susceptibility. In the future, household transmission studies will provide information on transmission dynamics, including the correlation of virus shedding and symptoms with transmission, and the correlation of new measures of immunity with protection against infection.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230490
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 11.776
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.285
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, TK-
dc.contributor.authorLau, LLH-
dc.contributor.authorCauchemez, S-
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:17:20Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:17:20Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationTrends in Microbiology, 2016, v. 24 n. 2, p. 123-133-
dc.identifier.issn0966-842X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230490-
dc.description.abstractHuman influenza viruses cause regular epidemics and occasional pandemics with a substantial public health burden. Household transmission studies have provided valuable information on the dynamics of influenza transmission. We reviewed published studies and found that once one household member is infected with influenza, the risk of infection in a household contact can be up to 38%, and the delay between onset in index and secondary cases is around 3 days. Younger age was associated with higher susceptibility. In the future, household transmission studies will provide information on transmission dynamics, including the correlation of virus shedding and symptoms with transmission, and the correlation of new measures of immunity with protection against infection.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd, Trends Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/tim-
dc.relation.ispartofTrends in Microbiology-
dc.subjectInfluenza-
dc.subjectTransmission-
dc.subjectControl-
dc.subjectHouseholds-
dc.subjectPublic health-
dc.titleHousehold Transmission of Influenza Virus-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTsang, TK: matklab@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, TK=rp02571-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tim.2015.10.012-
dc.identifier.pmid26612500-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4733423-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84959245326-
dc.identifier.hkuros260244-
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage123-
dc.identifier.epage133-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000369550600010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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