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Article: Comparative Epidemiology of Influenza B Yamagata- and Victoria-Lineage Viruses in Households

TitleComparative Epidemiology of Influenza B Yamagata- and Victoria-Lineage Viruses in Households
Authors
KeywordsDisease transmission
Influenza
Influenza B virus
Victoria lineage
Yamagata lineage
Issue Date2015
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
American Journal of Epidemiology, 2015, v. 182 n. 8, p. 705-713 How to Cite?
AbstractInfluenza B viruses split into 2 distinct lineages in the early 1980s, commonly named the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. There are few data on the comparative epidemiology of Victoria- and Yamagata-lineage viruses. In 2007–2011, we enrolled 75 and 34 households containing index patients with acute respiratory illness who tested positive for Yamagata- and Victoria-lineage viruses, respectively, from outpatient clinics in Hong Kong, China. These index patients and their household contacts were followed up for 7–10 days. We examined overall risk of polymerase chain reaction–confirmed infection among household contacts and the risk of secondary infection within households using an individual-based hazard model that accounted for tertiary transmission and infections occurring outside the household. We found that for Victoria-lineage viruses, the risk of within-household infection among household contacts aged ≤15 years was significantly higher (risk ratio = 12.9, 95% credibility interval: 4.2, 43.6) than that for older household contacts, while for Yamagata-lineage viruses, the risk of within-household infection for household contacts did not differ by age. Influenza B Yamagata- and Victoria-lineage viruses have similar characteristics in terms of viral shedding and clinical illness. The mechanisms underlying these epidemiologic differences deserve further investigation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230488
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.322
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.047
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, C-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, TK-
dc.contributor.authorFang, VJ-
dc.contributor.authorFung, ROP-
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKM-
dc.contributor.authorCauchemez, S-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM-
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:17:19Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:17:19Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Epidemiology, 2015, v. 182 n. 8, p. 705-713-
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230488-
dc.description.abstractInfluenza B viruses split into 2 distinct lineages in the early 1980s, commonly named the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. There are few data on the comparative epidemiology of Victoria- and Yamagata-lineage viruses. In 2007–2011, we enrolled 75 and 34 households containing index patients with acute respiratory illness who tested positive for Yamagata- and Victoria-lineage viruses, respectively, from outpatient clinics in Hong Kong, China. These index patients and their household contacts were followed up for 7–10 days. We examined overall risk of polymerase chain reaction–confirmed infection among household contacts and the risk of secondary infection within households using an individual-based hazard model that accounted for tertiary transmission and infections occurring outside the household. We found that for Victoria-lineage viruses, the risk of within-household infection among household contacts aged ≤15 years was significantly higher (risk ratio = 12.9, 95% credibility interval: 4.2, 43.6) than that for older household contacts, while for Yamagata-lineage viruses, the risk of within-household infection for household contacts did not differ by age. Influenza B Yamagata- and Victoria-lineage viruses have similar characteristics in terms of viral shedding and clinical illness. The mechanisms underlying these epidemiologic differences deserve further investigation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiology-
dc.subjectDisease transmission-
dc.subjectInfluenza-
dc.subjectInfluenza B virus-
dc.subjectVictoria lineage-
dc.subjectYamagata lineage-
dc.titleComparative Epidemiology of Influenza B Yamagata- and Victoria-Lineage Viruses in Households-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXu, C: xuceline@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KH: chankh2@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsang, TK: matklab@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFang, VJ: vickyf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFung, ROP: ropfung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, DKM: dkmip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KH=rp01921-
dc.identifier.authorityTsang, TK=rp02571-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, DKM=rp00256-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwv110-
dc.identifier.pmid26400854-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4715237-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84944235926-
dc.identifier.hkuros260235-
dc.identifier.volume182-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage705-
dc.identifier.epage713-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000362786700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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