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Book Chapter: Negation in Pichi (Equatorial Guinea): The case for areal convergence

TitleNegation in Pichi (Equatorial Guinea): The case for areal convergence
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherJohn Benjamins
Citation
Negation in Pichi (Equatorial Guinea): The case for areal convergence. In Déprez, Viviane; Henri, Fabiola (Eds.), Negation and negative concord: The view from creoles. Amsterdam: John Benjamins How to Cite?
AbstractThis chapter provides a detailed overview of negation in Pichi, the English- lexifier Creole spoken by the people of the island of Bioko (Equatorial Guinea). Pichi negation patterns align closely with areal negation patterns found across a broad swath of West Africa. Like the vast majority of genealogically diverse languages of the region, Pichi employs asymmetric negation strategies. These involve the use of subjunctive mood for the negation of imperatives, the use of suppletive portmanteau forms that combine negative polarity and aspect, and the use of an identity-equation copula that incorporates negative polarity, temporal-aspectual values, person deixis and pragmatic functions, and whose distribution is determined by complex morphosyntactic rules. Negative concord is strict and grammatically determined with the two negative indefinite pronouns that Pichi has. It is conventionalized, though probably not strict, with negative phrases featuring generic nouns that fulfil the functions of negative indefinite pronouns. I conclude that Pichi negation patterns are typically areal in character and cannot be seen to reflect a ‘creole’ linguistic type.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230452

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYakpo, K-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:17:07Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:17:07Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationNegation in Pichi (Equatorial Guinea): The case for areal convergence. In Déprez, Viviane; Henri, Fabiola (Eds.), Negation and negative concord: The view from creoles. Amsterdam: John Benjamins-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230452-
dc.description.abstractThis chapter provides a detailed overview of negation in Pichi, the English- lexifier Creole spoken by the people of the island of Bioko (Equatorial Guinea). Pichi negation patterns align closely with areal negation patterns found across a broad swath of West Africa. Like the vast majority of genealogically diverse languages of the region, Pichi employs asymmetric negation strategies. These involve the use of subjunctive mood for the negation of imperatives, the use of suppletive portmanteau forms that combine negative polarity and aspect, and the use of an identity-equation copula that incorporates negative polarity, temporal-aspectual values, person deixis and pragmatic functions, and whose distribution is determined by complex morphosyntactic rules. Negative concord is strict and grammatically determined with the two negative indefinite pronouns that Pichi has. It is conventionalized, though probably not strict, with negative phrases featuring generic nouns that fulfil the functions of negative indefinite pronouns. I conclude that Pichi negation patterns are typically areal in character and cannot be seen to reflect a ‘creole’ linguistic type.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins-
dc.relation.ispartofNegation and negative concord: The view from creoles-
dc.titleNegation in Pichi (Equatorial Guinea): The case for areal convergence-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailYakpo, K: kofi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYakpo, K=rp01715-
dc.identifier.hkuros260410-
dc.publisher.placeAmsterdam-

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