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Article: Interactions between boldness, foraging performance and behavioural plasticity across social contexts

TitleInteractions between boldness, foraging performance and behavioural plasticity across social contexts
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00265/index.htm
Citation
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractBoldness, the tendency to be explorative, risk prone and proactive, often varies consistently between individuals. An individual’s position on the boldness–shyness continuum hasmany implications. Bold individuals may outperform shyer conspecifics during foraging as they cover more ground, accumulate informationmore rapidly andmake more frequent food discoveries. Individual variation in boldness may also affect behavioural plasticity across environmental contexts, as the time to process new information, the ability to locate and memorise resources and the time and ability to apply prior information in a novel context all differ between individuals. The primary aim of the current study was to examine plasticity in, and covariation between, boldness, foraging speed and foraging accuracy across social foraging contexts.We showed that the stickleback that were shyest when foraging alone became relatively boldest when foraging in a social context and also delayed their entry to a known food patch the most in the presence of conspecifics. These results support the assertion that shyer foragers are more reactive to social cues and add to current knowledge of how an individual’s position on the boldness–shyness continuum may correlate to foraging task performance and behavioural plasticity. We conclude that the correlation between boldness and behavioural plasticity may have broad relevance as the ability to adjust or retain behaviours in changing social environments could often have consequences for fitness.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230287
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.382
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.373

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOlafsdottir, GA-
dc.contributor.authorMagellan, KMEG-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:16:11Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:16:11Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 2016-
dc.identifier.issn0340-5443-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/230287-
dc.description.abstractBoldness, the tendency to be explorative, risk prone and proactive, often varies consistently between individuals. An individual’s position on the boldness–shyness continuum hasmany implications. Bold individuals may outperform shyer conspecifics during foraging as they cover more ground, accumulate informationmore rapidly andmake more frequent food discoveries. Individual variation in boldness may also affect behavioural plasticity across environmental contexts, as the time to process new information, the ability to locate and memorise resources and the time and ability to apply prior information in a novel context all differ between individuals. The primary aim of the current study was to examine plasticity in, and covariation between, boldness, foraging speed and foraging accuracy across social foraging contexts.We showed that the stickleback that were shyest when foraging alone became relatively boldest when foraging in a social context and also delayed their entry to a known food patch the most in the presence of conspecifics. These results support the assertion that shyer foragers are more reactive to social cues and add to current knowledge of how an individual’s position on the boldness–shyness continuum may correlate to foraging task performance and behavioural plasticity. We conclude that the correlation between boldness and behavioural plasticity may have broad relevance as the ability to adjust or retain behaviours in changing social environments could often have consequences for fitness.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00265/index.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.titleInteractions between boldness, foraging performance and behavioural plasticity across social contexts-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailMagellan, KMEG: magellan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00265-016-2193-0-
dc.identifier.hkuros262047-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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