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Article: Small-strain shear modulus of volcanic granular soil: An experimental investigation

TitleSmall-strain shear modulus of volcanic granular soil: An experimental investigation
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering, 2016, v. 86, p. 15-24 How to Cite?
AbstractWhile volcanic soils exist in many places around the world, their mechanical behavior is however less extensively studied as compared to the conventional soil type such as quartz sand and clay. This paper presents an experimental study investigating the small-strain shear modulus (G0) and associated shear wave velocity (Vs) of a volcanic granular soil collected from the northeast of Japan that was affected by the devastating 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Reconstituted soil specimens were tested at different packing densities and confining stress levels by using the resonant column technique, and the pressure and density dependence of shear modulus was established for the soil. The study showed that under otherwise similar conditions, the G0 value of the volcanic soil was markedly lower than that of clean quartz sands, but it tended to increase significantly when the fine particles in the soil were removed. This finding suggests that the presence of fines plays an important role in the mechanical behavior of volcanic soils. A practical model accounting for the influence of fines and the pressure and density dependence is proposed and it is shown to provide reasonable estimates of G0 for both volcanic soils and clean quartz sands studied. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/229152
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.481
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.516
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLIU, X-
dc.contributor.authorYang, J-
dc.contributor.authorWang, G-
dc.contributor.authorChen, L-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:09:19Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:09:19Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationSoil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering, 2016, v. 86, p. 15-24-
dc.identifier.issn02677261-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/229152-
dc.description.abstractWhile volcanic soils exist in many places around the world, their mechanical behavior is however less extensively studied as compared to the conventional soil type such as quartz sand and clay. This paper presents an experimental study investigating the small-strain shear modulus (G0) and associated shear wave velocity (Vs) of a volcanic granular soil collected from the northeast of Japan that was affected by the devastating 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Reconstituted soil specimens were tested at different packing densities and confining stress levels by using the resonant column technique, and the pressure and density dependence of shear modulus was established for the soil. The study showed that under otherwise similar conditions, the G0 value of the volcanic soil was markedly lower than that of clean quartz sands, but it tended to increase significantly when the fine particles in the soil were removed. This finding suggests that the presence of fines plays an important role in the mechanical behavior of volcanic soils. A practical model accounting for the influence of fines and the pressure and density dependence is proposed and it is shown to provide reasonable estimates of G0 for both volcanic soils and clean quartz sands studied. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSoil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering-
dc.titleSmall-strain shear modulus of volcanic granular soil: An experimental investigation-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYang, J: junyang@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYang, J=rp00201-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.soildyn.2016.04.005-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84964378382-
dc.identifier.hkuros262425-
dc.identifier.volume86-
dc.identifier.spage15-
dc.identifier.epage24-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000377315000002-

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