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Conference Paper: Ritual space as an evolving process

TitleRitual space as an evolving process
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
The 2016 AAS-in-ASIA Conference, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, 24-27 June 2016. How to Cite?
AbstractThrough the experiences of a group of well-educated young Chinese female Muslim converts in Hong Kong, this paper examines how ritual space evolves in everyday practices. Among Hong Kong’s population of seven million, about 270,000 are Muslims, predominantly Indonesian domestic workers, and South Asian and African migrants. Only about 10% are ethnic Chinese – most have a root that can be traced to the Hui minority in Mainland China. Thus, in Hong Kong, Islam largely evokes imaginaries of ethnic minorities and “otherness.” To most Hong Kong people, it is particularly unimaginable that local Chinese females born and raised in this modern city should convert to Islam because many Islamic practices are stereotypically perceived to be incompatible with Chinese traditions or Hong Kong’s cosmopolitan ideals.
DescriptionConference Theme: Asia in Motion: Horizons of Hope
Session - 194. Interarea-Border Crossing-Diaspora
Organized by the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) and Doshisha University
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228825

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChee, WC-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-23T14:07:18Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-23T14:07:18Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2016 AAS-in-ASIA Conference, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, 24-27 June 2016.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228825-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Asia in Motion: Horizons of Hope-
dc.descriptionSession - 194. Interarea-Border Crossing-Diaspora-
dc.descriptionOrganized by the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) and Doshisha University-
dc.description.abstractThrough the experiences of a group of well-educated young Chinese female Muslim converts in Hong Kong, this paper examines how ritual space evolves in everyday practices. Among Hong Kong’s population of seven million, about 270,000 are Muslims, predominantly Indonesian domestic workers, and South Asian and African migrants. Only about 10% are ethnic Chinese – most have a root that can be traced to the Hui minority in Mainland China. Thus, in Hong Kong, Islam largely evokes imaginaries of ethnic minorities and “otherness.” To most Hong Kong people, it is particularly unimaginable that local Chinese females born and raised in this modern city should convert to Islam because many Islamic practices are stereotypically perceived to be incompatible with Chinese traditions or Hong Kong’s cosmopolitan ideals.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAAS-in-ASIA Conference-
dc.titleRitual space as an evolving process-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailChee, WC: wcchee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChee, WC=rp01966-
dc.identifier.hkuros261622-

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