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Article: Use of home automated intermittent peritoneal dialysis in the treatment of end stage renal failure

TitleUse of home automated intermittent peritoneal dialysis in the treatment of end stage renal failure
Authors
Issue Date1994
Citation
International Urology and Nephrology, 1994, v. 26, n. 3, p. 353-358 How to Cite?
AbstractWe report our retrospective analysis of 16 uraemic patients who were treated with home automated intermittent peritoneal dialysis (IPD) from 1988 to 1993. Six patients were diabetic. The mean age was 58.5 years. The reasons for home automated IPD were: old age, poor eyesight, low intelligence or poor dexterity, family or patient request and old stroke. It took an average of 8.8 sessions to train the helper. The mean frequency of the home IPD was once every 5.8 days with a mean volume of 48 litres of dialysate used during each dialysis. There were 3 peritonitis episodes making the peritonitis rate once every 93 patient months. Four patients were still on home IPD and two were transplanted. Ten patients died of stroke, myocardial infarction, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive lung disease or suicide. A low plasma albumin is the only significant parameter in the early mortality group. Such high mortality can be accounted for by the fact that patients were older and forty per cent were diabetic. We conclude that home automated IPD can be an alternative for some patients in whom other modes of dialysis are difficult. © 1994 Akadémiai Kiadó.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228423
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.292
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.506

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, P. K T-
dc.contributor.authorWang, A. Y M-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, C. B.-
dc.contributor.authorLui, S. F.-
dc.contributor.authorLai, K. N.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-13T08:02:22Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-13T08:02:22Z-
dc.date.issued1994-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Urology and Nephrology, 1994, v. 26, n. 3, p. 353-358-
dc.identifier.issn0301-1623-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228423-
dc.description.abstractWe report our retrospective analysis of 16 uraemic patients who were treated with home automated intermittent peritoneal dialysis (IPD) from 1988 to 1993. Six patients were diabetic. The mean age was 58.5 years. The reasons for home automated IPD were: old age, poor eyesight, low intelligence or poor dexterity, family or patient request and old stroke. It took an average of 8.8 sessions to train the helper. The mean frequency of the home IPD was once every 5.8 days with a mean volume of 48 litres of dialysate used during each dialysis. There were 3 peritonitis episodes making the peritonitis rate once every 93 patient months. Four patients were still on home IPD and two were transplanted. Ten patients died of stroke, myocardial infarction, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive lung disease or suicide. A low plasma albumin is the only significant parameter in the early mortality group. Such high mortality can be accounted for by the fact that patients were older and forty per cent were diabetic. We conclude that home automated IPD can be an alternative for some patients in whom other modes of dialysis are difficult. © 1994 Akadémiai Kiadó.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Urology and Nephrology-
dc.titleUse of home automated intermittent peritoneal dialysis in the treatment of end stage renal failure-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF02768221-
dc.identifier.pmid7960548-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028305447-
dc.identifier.volume26-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage353-
dc.identifier.epage358-
dc.identifier.eissn1573-2584-

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