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Article: Evaluation of handgrip strength as a nutritional marker and prognostic indicator in peritoneal dialysis patients

TitleEvaluation of handgrip strength as a nutritional marker and prognostic indicator in peritoneal dialysis patients
Authors
KeywordsHandgrip strength
Issue Date2005
Citation
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2005, v. 81, n. 1, p. 79-86 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Serum albumin has limitations as a nutritional marker in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) in that it is affected by inflammation, systemic disease, overhydration, and urinary and dialysate protein loss. Handgrip strength is a simple, easily performed bedside test that has been shown to correlate with lean body mass in patients close to inception of dialysis. Objective: We evaluated the associations of handgrip strength with other clinical factors and examined its relations with mortality and cardiovascular death in PD patients. Design: We prospectively enrolled 233 chronic PD patients and assessed handgrip strength and other variables at baseline and then followed the patients for a mean (±SD) of 30 ± 14 mo. Results: Baseline handgrip strength was significantly associated with age, sex, height, diabetes, residual glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and hemoglobin but not with C-reactive protein (CRP). After adjustment for age, sex, and height, handgrip strength was most strongly correlated with lean body mass on the basis of creatinine kinetics (r = 0.334, P < 0.001), followed by serum albumin and subjective global assessment. Both men and women who died had lower handgrip strengths than did those who remained alive (P < 0.001). After control for age, sex, diabetes, atherosclerotic vascular disease, GFR, hemoglobin, CRP, and serum albumin, greater handgrip strength was predictive of lower all-cause [hazards ratio (HR): 0.95 (95% CI: 0.92, 0.99); P = 0.005] and cardiovascular [HR: 0.94 (0.90, 0.98); P = 0.004] mortality. Conclusions: Handgrip strength not only is a marker of body lean muscle mass but also provides important prognostic information independent of other covariates, including CRP and serum albumin. Our data suggest that handgrip strength may be used in conjunction with serum albumin as a nutrition-monitoring tool in patients undergoing PD. © 2005 American Society for Clinical Nutrition.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228404
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.703
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.771

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, A. Y M-
dc.contributor.authorSea, M. M M-
dc.contributor.authorHo, Z. S Y-
dc.contributor.authorLui, Siu F.-
dc.contributor.authorLi, P. K T-
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jean-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-13T08:02:19Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-13T08:02:19Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2005, v. 81, n. 1, p. 79-86-
dc.identifier.issn0002-9165-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228404-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Serum albumin has limitations as a nutritional marker in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) in that it is affected by inflammation, systemic disease, overhydration, and urinary and dialysate protein loss. Handgrip strength is a simple, easily performed bedside test that has been shown to correlate with lean body mass in patients close to inception of dialysis. Objective: We evaluated the associations of handgrip strength with other clinical factors and examined its relations with mortality and cardiovascular death in PD patients. Design: We prospectively enrolled 233 chronic PD patients and assessed handgrip strength and other variables at baseline and then followed the patients for a mean (±SD) of 30 ± 14 mo. Results: Baseline handgrip strength was significantly associated with age, sex, height, diabetes, residual glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and hemoglobin but not with C-reactive protein (CRP). After adjustment for age, sex, and height, handgrip strength was most strongly correlated with lean body mass on the basis of creatinine kinetics (r = 0.334, P < 0.001), followed by serum albumin and subjective global assessment. Both men and women who died had lower handgrip strengths than did those who remained alive (P < 0.001). After control for age, sex, diabetes, atherosclerotic vascular disease, GFR, hemoglobin, CRP, and serum albumin, greater handgrip strength was predictive of lower all-cause [hazards ratio (HR): 0.95 (95% CI: 0.92, 0.99); P = 0.005] and cardiovascular [HR: 0.94 (0.90, 0.98); P = 0.004] mortality. Conclusions: Handgrip strength not only is a marker of body lean muscle mass but also provides important prognostic information independent of other covariates, including CRP and serum albumin. Our data suggest that handgrip strength may be used in conjunction with serum albumin as a nutrition-monitoring tool in patients undergoing PD. © 2005 American Society for Clinical Nutrition.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition-
dc.subjectHandgrip strength-
dc.titleEvaluation of handgrip strength as a nutritional marker and prognostic indicator in peritoneal dialysis patients-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid15640464-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-13744257736-
dc.identifier.volume81-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage79-
dc.identifier.epage86-

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