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Article: CO<inf>2</inf> outgassing from the Yellow River network and its implications for riverine carbon cycle

TitleCO&lt;inf&gt;2&lt;/inf&gt; outgassing from the Yellow River network and its implications for riverine carbon cycle
Authors
Keywordscarbon budget
Issue Date2015
Citation
Journal of Geophysical Research G: Biogeosciences, 2015, v. 120, n. 7, p. 1334-1347 How to Cite?
Abstract©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.CO2 outgassing across water-air interface is an important, but poorly quantified, component of riverine carbon cycle, largely because the data needed for flux calculations are spatially and temporally sparse. Based on compiled data sets measured throughout the Yellow River watershed and chamber measurements on the main stem, this study investigates CO2 evasion and assesses its implications for riverine carbon cycle. Fluxes of CO2 evasion present significant spatial and seasonal variations. High effluxes are estimated in regions with intense rock weathering or severe soil erosion that mobilizes organic carbon into the river network. By integrating seasonal changes of water surface area and gas transfer velocity (k), the CO2 efflux is estimated at 7.9±1.2TgCyr-1 with a mean k of 42.1±16.9cmh-1. Unlike in lake and estuarine environments where wind is the main generator of turbulence, k is more correlated with flow velocity changes. CO2 evasion in the Yellow River network constitutes an important pathway in its riverine carbon cycling. Analyzing the watershed-scale carbon budget indicates that 35% of the carbon exported into the Yellow River network from land is degassed during fluvial transport. The CO2 efflux is comparable to the carbon burial rate, while both larger than the fluvial export to the ocean. Comparing CO2 evasion with ecosystem productivity in the Yellow River watershed shows that its ecosystem carbon sink has previously been overestimated by >50%. Present efflux estimates are associated with uncertainty, and future work is needed to mechanistically understand CO2 evasion from the highly turbid waters.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228225
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRan, Lishan-
dc.contributor.authorLu, Xi Xi-
dc.contributor.authorYang, Huan-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Lingyu-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Ruihong-
dc.contributor.authorSun, Huiguo-
dc.contributor.authorHan, Jingtai-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:30Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:30Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research G: Biogeosciences, 2015, v. 120, n. 7, p. 1334-1347-
dc.identifier.issn2169-8953-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228225-
dc.description.abstract©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.CO<inf>2</inf> outgassing across water-air interface is an important, but poorly quantified, component of riverine carbon cycle, largely because the data needed for flux calculations are spatially and temporally sparse. Based on compiled data sets measured throughout the Yellow River watershed and chamber measurements on the main stem, this study investigates CO<inf>2</inf> evasion and assesses its implications for riverine carbon cycle. Fluxes of CO<inf>2</inf> evasion present significant spatial and seasonal variations. High effluxes are estimated in regions with intense rock weathering or severe soil erosion that mobilizes organic carbon into the river network. By integrating seasonal changes of water surface area and gas transfer velocity (k), the CO<inf>2</inf> efflux is estimated at 7.9±1.2TgCyr<sup>-1</sup> with a mean k of 42.1±16.9cmh<sup>-1</sup>. Unlike in lake and estuarine environments where wind is the main generator of turbulence, k is more correlated with flow velocity changes. CO<inf>2</inf> evasion in the Yellow River network constitutes an important pathway in its riverine carbon cycling. Analyzing the watershed-scale carbon budget indicates that 35% of the carbon exported into the Yellow River network from land is degassed during fluvial transport. The CO<inf>2</inf> efflux is comparable to the carbon burial rate, while both larger than the fluvial export to the ocean. Comparing CO<inf>2</inf> evasion with ecosystem productivity in the Yellow River watershed shows that its ecosystem carbon sink has previously been overestimated by >50%. Present efflux estimates are associated with uncertainty, and future work is needed to mechanistically understand CO<inf>2</inf> evasion from the highly turbid waters.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Geophysical Research G: Biogeosciences-
dc.subjectcarbon budget-
dc.titleCO&lt;inf&gt;2&lt;/inf&gt; outgassing from the Yellow River network and its implications for riverine carbon cycle-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2015JG002982-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84939263516-
dc.identifier.volume120-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage1334-
dc.identifier.epage1347-
dc.identifier.eissn2169-8961-

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