File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Intensive training induces longitudinal changes in meditation state-related EEG oscillatory activity

TitleIntensive training induces longitudinal changes in meditation state-related EEG oscillatory activity
Authors
KeywordsAttention
Issue Date2012
Citation
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2012, n. SEPTEMBER How to Cite?
AbstractThe capacity to focus one's attention for an extended period of time can be increased through training in contemplative practices. However the cognitive processes engaged during meditation that support trait changes in cognition are not well characterized. We conducted a longitudinal wait-list controlled study of intensive meditation training. Retreat participants practiced focused attention (FA) meditation techniques for three months during an initial retreat. Wait-list participants later undertook formally identical training during a second retreat. Dense-array scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) data were collected during 6 min of mindfulness of breathing meditation at three assessment points during each retreat. Second-order blind source separation along with a novel semi-automatic artifact removal tool (SMART) was used for data preprocessing. We observed replicable reductions in meditative state-related beta-band power bilaterally over anteriocentral and posterior scalp regions. In addition individual alpha frequency (IAF) decreased across both retreats and in direct relation to the amount of meditative practice. These findings provide evidence for replicable longitudinal changes in brain oscillatory activity during meditation and increase our understanding of the cortical processes engaged during meditation that may support long-term improvements in cognition. © 2012 Saggar King Zanesco MacLean Aichele Jacobs Bridwell Shaver Rosenberg Sahdra Ferrer Tang Mangun Wallace Miikkulainen and Saron.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228146
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.634
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.841

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSaggar, Manish-
dc.contributor.authorKing, Brandon G.-
dc.contributor.authorZanesco, Anthony P.-
dc.contributor.authorMacLean, Katherine A.-
dc.contributor.authorAichele, Stephen R.-
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Tonya L.-
dc.contributor.authorBridwell, David A.-
dc.contributor.authorShaver, Phillip R.-
dc.contributor.authorRosenberg, Erika L.-
dc.contributor.authorSahdra, Baljinder K.-
dc.contributor.authorFerrer, Emilio-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Akaysha C.-
dc.contributor.authorMangun, George R.-
dc.contributor.authorAlan Wallace, B.-
dc.contributor.authorMiikkulainen, Risto-
dc.contributor.authorSaron, Clifford D.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:18Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:18Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2012, n. SEPTEMBER-
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228146-
dc.description.abstractThe capacity to focus one's attention for an extended period of time can be increased through training in contemplative practices. However the cognitive processes engaged during meditation that support trait changes in cognition are not well characterized. We conducted a longitudinal wait-list controlled study of intensive meditation training. Retreat participants practiced focused attention (FA) meditation techniques for three months during an initial retreat. Wait-list participants later undertook formally identical training during a second retreat. Dense-array scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) data were collected during 6 min of mindfulness of breathing meditation at three assessment points during each retreat. Second-order blind source separation along with a novel semi-automatic artifact removal tool (SMART) was used for data preprocessing. We observed replicable reductions in meditative state-related beta-band power bilaterally over anteriocentral and posterior scalp regions. In addition individual alpha frequency (IAF) decreased across both retreats and in direct relation to the amount of meditative practice. These findings provide evidence for replicable longitudinal changes in brain oscillatory activity during meditation and increase our understanding of the cortical processes engaged during meditation that may support long-term improvements in cognition. © 2012 Saggar King Zanesco MacLean Aichele Jacobs Bridwell Shaver Rosenberg Sahdra Ferrer Tang Mangun Wallace Miikkulainen and Saron.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Human Neuroscience-
dc.subjectAttention-
dc.titleIntensive training induces longitudinal changes in meditation state-related EEG oscillatory activity-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867176990-
dc.identifier.issueSEPTEMBER-
dc.identifier.spagenull-
dc.identifier.epagenull-
dc.identifier.eissn1662-5161-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats