File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Asymmetric Effects of Regulatory Focus on Expected Desirability and Feasibility of Embracing Self-Service Technologies

TitleAsymmetric Effects of Regulatory Focus on Expected Desirability and Feasibility of Embracing Self-Service Technologies
Authors
Issue Date2012
Citation
Psychology and Marketing, 2012, v. 29, n. 4, p. 209-225 How to Cite?
AbstractThis research draws on regulatory focus theory to examine the asymmetric effects of regulatory focus (promotion focus versus prevention focus) on expected desirability and feasibility of using self-service technologies (SSTs) in a retail setting. To study consumers' SST trial intention from the perspective of regulatory focus theory, this research first integrates the attributes of SSTs explored in prior studies into a desirability-feasibility framework. The proposed asymmetric effects of regulatory focus (promotion focus versus prevention focus) lie in both scope (on desirability, feasibility, versus both desirability and feasibility) and valence (positive versus negative): The promotion focus facilitates consumers to recognize both desirability (consumption value) and feasibility of using SSTs, whereas the prevention focus inhibits consumers from understanding the feasibility-related attributes of SSTs. In addition, it is proposed that the promotion focus contributes to the easement of consumers' technology anxiety, whereas the prevention focus has a reverse effect. Furthermore, expected desirability (consumption value) and feasibility both positively influence consumers' intention to adopt SSTs, whereas technology anxiety negatively affects consumers' trial intention. Structural equation modeling is used to test the overall model, and the results support the hypotheses in general. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228132
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.367
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.006

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJia, He Michael-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yonggui-
dc.contributor.authorGe, Lin-
dc.contributor.authorShi, Guicheng-
dc.contributor.authorYao, Shanji-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:16Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationPsychology and Marketing, 2012, v. 29, n. 4, p. 209-225-
dc.identifier.issn0742-6046-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228132-
dc.description.abstractThis research draws on regulatory focus theory to examine the asymmetric effects of regulatory focus (promotion focus versus prevention focus) on expected desirability and feasibility of using self-service technologies (SSTs) in a retail setting. To study consumers' SST trial intention from the perspective of regulatory focus theory, this research first integrates the attributes of SSTs explored in prior studies into a desirability-feasibility framework. The proposed asymmetric effects of regulatory focus (promotion focus versus prevention focus) lie in both scope (on desirability, feasibility, versus both desirability and feasibility) and valence (positive versus negative): The promotion focus facilitates consumers to recognize both desirability (consumption value) and feasibility of using SSTs, whereas the prevention focus inhibits consumers from understanding the feasibility-related attributes of SSTs. In addition, it is proposed that the promotion focus contributes to the easement of consumers' technology anxiety, whereas the prevention focus has a reverse effect. Furthermore, expected desirability (consumption value) and feasibility both positively influence consumers' intention to adopt SSTs, whereas technology anxiety negatively affects consumers' trial intention. Structural equation modeling is used to test the overall model, and the results support the hypotheses in general. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology and Marketing-
dc.titleAsymmetric Effects of Regulatory Focus on Expected Desirability and Feasibility of Embracing Self-Service Technologies-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/mar.20516-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859133842-
dc.identifier.volume29-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage209-
dc.identifier.epage225-
dc.identifier.eissn1520-6793-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats