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Article: Genetic features of resident biofilms determine attachment of Listeria monocytogenes

TitleGenetic features of resident biofilms determine attachment of Listeria monocytogenes
Authors
Issue Date2009
Citation
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2009, v. 75, n. 24, p. 7814-7821 How to Cite?
AbstractPlanktonic Listeria monocytogenes cells in food-processing environments tend most frequently to adhere to solid surfaces. Under these conditions, they are likely to encounter resident biofilms rather than a raw solid surface. Although metabolic interactions between L. monocytogenes and resident microflora have been widely studied, little is known about the biofilm properties that influence the initial fixation of L. monocytogenes to the biofilm interface. To study these properties, we created a set of model resident Lactococcus lactis biofilms with various architectures, types of matrices, and individual cell surface properties. This was achieved using cell wall mutants that affect bacterial chain formation, exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis and surface hydrophobicity. The dynamics of the formation of these biofilm structures were analyzed in flow cell chambers using in situ time course confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging. All the L. lactis biofilms tested reduced the initial immobilization of L. monocytogenes compared to the glass substratum of the flow cell. Significant differences were seen in L. monocytogenes settlement as a function of the genetic background of resident lactococcal biofilm cells. In particular, biofilms of the L. lactis chain-forming mutant resulted in a marked increase in L. monocytogenes settlement, while biofilms of the EPS-secreting mutant efficiently prevented pathogen fixation. These results offer new insights into the role of resident biofilms in governing the settlement of pathogens on food chain surfaces and could be of relevance in the field of food safety controls. Copyright © 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228092
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.823
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.891

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHabimana, Olivier-
dc.contributor.authorMeyrand, Mickael-
dc.contributor.authorMeylheuc, Thierry-
dc.contributor.authorKulakauskas, Saulius-
dc.contributor.authorBriandet, Romain-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:10Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:10Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationApplied and Environmental Microbiology, 2009, v. 75, n. 24, p. 7814-7821-
dc.identifier.issn0099-2240-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228092-
dc.description.abstractPlanktonic Listeria monocytogenes cells in food-processing environments tend most frequently to adhere to solid surfaces. Under these conditions, they are likely to encounter resident biofilms rather than a raw solid surface. Although metabolic interactions between L. monocytogenes and resident microflora have been widely studied, little is known about the biofilm properties that influence the initial fixation of L. monocytogenes to the biofilm interface. To study these properties, we created a set of model resident Lactococcus lactis biofilms with various architectures, types of matrices, and individual cell surface properties. This was achieved using cell wall mutants that affect bacterial chain formation, exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis and surface hydrophobicity. The dynamics of the formation of these biofilm structures were analyzed in flow cell chambers using in situ time course confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging. All the L. lactis biofilms tested reduced the initial immobilization of L. monocytogenes compared to the glass substratum of the flow cell. Significant differences were seen in L. monocytogenes settlement as a function of the genetic background of resident lactococcal biofilm cells. In particular, biofilms of the L. lactis chain-forming mutant resulted in a marked increase in L. monocytogenes settlement, while biofilms of the EPS-secreting mutant efficiently prevented pathogen fixation. These results offer new insights into the role of resident biofilms in governing the settlement of pathogens on food chain surfaces and could be of relevance in the field of food safety controls. Copyright © 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofApplied and Environmental Microbiology-
dc.titleGenetic features of resident biofilms determine attachment of Listeria monocytogenes-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/AEM.01333-09-
dc.identifier.pmid19837841-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-73249143773-
dc.identifier.volume75-
dc.identifier.issue24-
dc.identifier.spage7814-
dc.identifier.epage7821-
dc.identifier.eissn1098-5336-

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