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Article: Canadian ophthalmology residency training: An evaluation of resident satisfaction and comparison with international standards

TitleCanadian ophthalmology residency training: An evaluation of resident satisfaction and comparison with international standards
Authors
KeywordsCurriculum
Issue Date2009
Citation
Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology, 2009, v. 44, n. 5, p. 540-547 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To evaluate the adequacy of Canadian ophthalmology residency programs in achieving the competencies outlined by the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) and to assess residents' satisfaction with their training programs. Design: Cross-sectional web-based survey. Participants: Canadian residents enrolled in the final 2 years of English and French ophthalmology programs, as well as recent graduates from 2005 to 2008. Methods: Graduates and eligible residents were invited to participate in the 43-item survey during the autumn of 2008. Data were categorized by demographic variables, and basic statistics were done. Results: Of the 99 individuals surveyed, 40 (40%) responded, representing 26 current residents and 14 graduates. The vast majority (85%) of respondents were satisfied with their residency program. Clinic-based training was generally rated satisfactorily; however, respondents reported insufficient exposure to low-vision rehabilitation (77.5%), refraction and glasses prescription (65%), and neuro-ophthalmology (45%). Respondents were similarly satisfied with their surgical experiences, most of them (>60%) rating case volume, complexity, and variety as satisfactory or better. However, many stated that they had insufficient exposure to extracapsular cataract extraction (72.5%), refractive surgery (72.5%), and orbital surgery (57.5%). Of the graduates surveyed, all passed their Royal College licensing examinations on the first attempt and felt that residency adequately prepared them for the examinations. They reported insufficient training in certain nonclinical areas, such as practice management, and staffing and administration skills. Conclusions: Canadian ophthalmology residents express high levels of satisfaction with their residency training programs. Although most programs appear to adequately address most ICO core objectives, certain curriculum modifications are required.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228086
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.46
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.685

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Alysia W.-
dc.contributor.authorNoble, Jason-
dc.contributor.authorLam, Wai Ching-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:09Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:09Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationCanadian Journal of Ophthalmology, 2009, v. 44, n. 5, p. 540-547-
dc.identifier.issn0008-4182-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228086-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate the adequacy of Canadian ophthalmology residency programs in achieving the competencies outlined by the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) and to assess residents' satisfaction with their training programs. Design: Cross-sectional web-based survey. Participants: Canadian residents enrolled in the final 2 years of English and French ophthalmology programs, as well as recent graduates from 2005 to 2008. Methods: Graduates and eligible residents were invited to participate in the 43-item survey during the autumn of 2008. Data were categorized by demographic variables, and basic statistics were done. Results: Of the 99 individuals surveyed, 40 (40%) responded, representing 26 current residents and 14 graduates. The vast majority (85%) of respondents were satisfied with their residency program. Clinic-based training was generally rated satisfactorily; however, respondents reported insufficient exposure to low-vision rehabilitation (77.5%), refraction and glasses prescription (65%), and neuro-ophthalmology (45%). Respondents were similarly satisfied with their surgical experiences, most of them (>60%) rating case volume, complexity, and variety as satisfactory or better. However, many stated that they had insufficient exposure to extracapsular cataract extraction (72.5%), refractive surgery (72.5%), and orbital surgery (57.5%). Of the graduates surveyed, all passed their Royal College licensing examinations on the first attempt and felt that residency adequately prepared them for the examinations. They reported insufficient training in certain nonclinical areas, such as practice management, and staffing and administration skills. Conclusions: Canadian ophthalmology residents express high levels of satisfaction with their residency training programs. Although most programs appear to adequately address most ICO core objectives, certain curriculum modifications are required.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofCanadian Journal of Ophthalmology-
dc.subjectCurriculum-
dc.titleCanadian ophthalmology residency training: An evaluation of resident satisfaction and comparison with international standards-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3129/i09-155-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349454078-
dc.identifier.volume44-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage540-
dc.identifier.epage547-
dc.identifier.eissn1715-3360-

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