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Article: Food additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial

TitleFood additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial
Authors
Issue Date2007
Citation
Lancet, 2007, v. 370, n. 9598, p. 1560-1567 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: We undertook a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial to test whether intake of artificial food colour and additives (AFCA) affected childhood behaviour. Methods: 153 3-year-old and 144 8/9-year-old children were included in the study. The challenge drink contained sodium benzoate and one of two AFCA mixes (A or B) or a placebo mix. The main outcome measure was a global hyperactivity aggregate (GHA), based on aggregated z-scores of observed behaviours and ratings by teachers and parents, plus, for 8/9-year-old children, a computerised test of attention. This clinical trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials (registration number ISRCTN74481308). Analysis was per protocol. Findings: 16 3-year-old children and 14 8/9-year-old children did not complete the study, for reasons unrelated to childhood behaviour. Mix A had a significantly adverse effect compared with placebo in GHA for all 3-year-old children (effect size 0·20 [95% CI 0·01-0·39], p=0·044) but not mix B versus placebo. This result persisted when analysis was restricted to 3-year-old children who consumed more than 85% of juice and had no missing data (0·32 [0·05-0·60], p=0·02). 8/9-year-old children showed a significantly adverse effect when given mix A (0·12 [0·02-0·23], p=0·023) or mix B (0·17 [0·07-0·28], p=0·001) when analysis was restricted to those children consuming at least 85% of drinks with no missing data. Interpretation: Artificial colours or a sodium benzoate preservative (or both) in the diet result in increased hyperactivity in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the general population. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228050
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 44.002
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 14.638

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcCann, Donna-
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Angelina-
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Alison-
dc.contributor.authorCrumpler, Debbie-
dc.contributor.authorDalen, Lindy-
dc.contributor.authorGrimshaw, Kate-
dc.contributor.authorKitchin, Elizabeth-
dc.contributor.authorLok, Kris-
dc.contributor.authorPorteous, Lucy-
dc.contributor.authorPrince, Emily-
dc.contributor.authorSonuga-Barke, Edmund-
dc.contributor.authorWarner, John O.-
dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Jim-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:04Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:04Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationLancet, 2007, v. 370, n. 9598, p. 1560-1567-
dc.identifier.issn0140-6736-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228050-
dc.description.abstractBackground: We undertook a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial to test whether intake of artificial food colour and additives (AFCA) affected childhood behaviour. Methods: 153 3-year-old and 144 8/9-year-old children were included in the study. The challenge drink contained sodium benzoate and one of two AFCA mixes (A or B) or a placebo mix. The main outcome measure was a global hyperactivity aggregate (GHA), based on aggregated z-scores of observed behaviours and ratings by teachers and parents, plus, for 8/9-year-old children, a computerised test of attention. This clinical trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials (registration number ISRCTN74481308). Analysis was per protocol. Findings: 16 3-year-old children and 14 8/9-year-old children did not complete the study, for reasons unrelated to childhood behaviour. Mix A had a significantly adverse effect compared with placebo in GHA for all 3-year-old children (effect size 0·20 [95% CI 0·01-0·39], p=0·044) but not mix B versus placebo. This result persisted when analysis was restricted to 3-year-old children who consumed more than 85% of juice and had no missing data (0·32 [0·05-0·60], p=0·02). 8/9-year-old children showed a significantly adverse effect when given mix A (0·12 [0·02-0·23], p=0·023) or mix B (0·17 [0·07-0·28], p=0·001) when analysis was restricted to those children consuming at least 85% of drinks with no missing data. Interpretation: Artificial colours or a sodium benzoate preservative (or both) in the diet result in increased hyperactivity in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the general population. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofLancet-
dc.titleFood additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0140-6736(07)61306-3-
dc.identifier.pmid17825405-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35548943929-
dc.identifier.volume370-
dc.identifier.issue9598-
dc.identifier.spage1560-
dc.identifier.epage1567-

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