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Article: Effects of long-term estrogen replacement on social investigation and social memory in ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice

TitleEffects of long-term estrogen replacement on social investigation and social memory in ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice
Authors
KeywordsCorticosterone
Issue Date2005
Citation
Hormones and Behavior, 2005, v. 47, n. 3, p. 350-357 How to Cite?
AbstractEstrogen has been shown to play a role in modulating social recognition memory. However, the literature regarding the influence of estrogen on social memory is sparse and only covers two experimental manipulations: acute injections and receptor knockout. Long-term effects of estrogen replacement on social investigation and social recognition are unknown. Furthermore, existing social recognition protocols focus on memory of very short durations (<2 h). In the present study, we examined long-term effects of estrogen replacement on both short- (<30 min) and long-term (24 h) social recognition in ovariectomized female C57BL/6 mice by implanting 60-day time-release pellets containing physiological doses of estradiol (0, 0.18, or 0.72 mg of 17β-estradiol). After 55 days of treatment, evidence of social recognition memory, measured by 24-h habituation, was found only in mice receiving the 0.72-mg pellet. This result is remarkable as previous reports indicate that individually-housed untreated rats and mice do not show habituation beyond 2 h. Our study further revealed that estrogen also increased frequencies of baseline social investigation without affecting general activity levels and decreased delayed post-swim-stress serum corticosterone concentration. Thus, these results suggest that long-term estrogen replacement increased the interest in social interaction as well as decreased stress responses. It is likely that the 24-h habituation observed in the estrogen replacement group is mediated jointly by the non-mnemonic effects of estrogen on the behavior displayed during the stage of memory encoding as well as mnemonic effects during the stage of memory consolidation. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228028
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.34
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.876

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, Akaysha C.-
dc.contributor.authorNakazawa, Masato-
dc.contributor.authorRomeo, Russell D.-
dc.contributor.authorReeb, Bethany C.-
dc.contributor.authorSisti, Helene-
dc.contributor.authorMcEwen, Bruce S.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:00Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationHormones and Behavior, 2005, v. 47, n. 3, p. 350-357-
dc.identifier.issn0018-506X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228028-
dc.description.abstractEstrogen has been shown to play a role in modulating social recognition memory. However, the literature regarding the influence of estrogen on social memory is sparse and only covers two experimental manipulations: acute injections and receptor knockout. Long-term effects of estrogen replacement on social investigation and social recognition are unknown. Furthermore, existing social recognition protocols focus on memory of very short durations (<2 h). In the present study, we examined long-term effects of estrogen replacement on both short- (<30 min) and long-term (24 h) social recognition in ovariectomized female C57BL/6 mice by implanting 60-day time-release pellets containing physiological doses of estradiol (0, 0.18, or 0.72 mg of 17β-estradiol). After 55 days of treatment, evidence of social recognition memory, measured by 24-h habituation, was found only in mice receiving the 0.72-mg pellet. This result is remarkable as previous reports indicate that individually-housed untreated rats and mice do not show habituation beyond 2 h. Our study further revealed that estrogen also increased frequencies of baseline social investigation without affecting general activity levels and decreased delayed post-swim-stress serum corticosterone concentration. Thus, these results suggest that long-term estrogen replacement increased the interest in social interaction as well as decreased stress responses. It is likely that the 24-h habituation observed in the estrogen replacement group is mediated jointly by the non-mnemonic effects of estrogen on the behavior displayed during the stage of memory encoding as well as mnemonic effects during the stage of memory consolidation. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHormones and Behavior-
dc.subjectCorticosterone-
dc.titleEffects of long-term estrogen replacement on social investigation and social memory in ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.yhbeh.2004.10.010-
dc.identifier.pmid15708765-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-13544275028-
dc.identifier.volume47-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage350-
dc.identifier.epage357-

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