File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Neonatal Novelty Exposure, Dynamics of Brain Asymmetry, and Social Recognition Memory

TitleNeonatal Novelty Exposure, Dynamics of Brain Asymmetry, and Social Recognition Memory
Authors
KeywordsAsymmetry
Issue Date2004
Citation
Developmental Psychobiology, 2004, v. 44, n. 1, p. 84-93 How to Cite?
AbstractBrief and transient early-life stimulation via neonatal handling and neonatal novelty exposure can lead to differential changes within the right and left brains. In rats, these lateralized changes have been demonstrated behaviorally, neuroanatomically and neurophysiologically. Recently, we found that neonatal novelty exposure can prolong the duration of social recognition memory from less than 2 hr to at least 24 hr among male rats reared in social isolation and that this enhancement is associated with an initial right-turn preference in a novel testing cage. In contrast to stable forms of asymmetry, such as handedness, we show that this turning asymmetry is dynamic-decreasing as the animal adjusts to the novel testing environment over a 2-day period. This change in turning asymmetry was found only among animals that experienced neonatal novelty exposure during the first 3 weeks of their lives. Furthermore, individual differences in short-term social recognition memory for a conspecific can be predicted by this change in functional asymmetry. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228024
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.128
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.329

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, Akaysha C.-
dc.contributor.authorReeb, Bethany C.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-01T06:45:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-01T06:45:00Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationDevelopmental Psychobiology, 2004, v. 44, n. 1, p. 84-93-
dc.identifier.issn0012-1630-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/228024-
dc.description.abstractBrief and transient early-life stimulation via neonatal handling and neonatal novelty exposure can lead to differential changes within the right and left brains. In rats, these lateralized changes have been demonstrated behaviorally, neuroanatomically and neurophysiologically. Recently, we found that neonatal novelty exposure can prolong the duration of social recognition memory from less than 2 hr to at least 24 hr among male rats reared in social isolation and that this enhancement is associated with an initial right-turn preference in a novel testing cage. In contrast to stable forms of asymmetry, such as handedness, we show that this turning asymmetry is dynamic-decreasing as the animal adjusts to the novel testing environment over a 2-day period. This change in turning asymmetry was found only among animals that experienced neonatal novelty exposure during the first 3 weeks of their lives. Furthermore, individual differences in short-term social recognition memory for a conspecific can be predicted by this change in functional asymmetry. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopmental Psychobiology-
dc.subjectAsymmetry-
dc.titleNeonatal Novelty Exposure, Dynamics of Brain Asymmetry, and Social Recognition Memory-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/dev.10158-
dc.identifier.pmid14704992-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0347415652-
dc.identifier.volume44-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage84-
dc.identifier.epage93-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats