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Conference Paper: Basal Ganglia and Behaviour: Behavioural Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation in Experimental Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders

TitleBasal Ganglia and Behaviour: Behavioural Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation in Experimental Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer.
Citation
The 9th Triennial Meeting of the International-Basal-Ganglia-Society, Egmond aan Zee, Netherlands, 2-6 September 2007. In The Basal Ganglia IX, 2009, p. 471-482 How to Cite?
AbstractThe use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to control severely disabling neurological and psychiatric conditions is an exciting and fast emerging area of neuroscience. Deep brain stimulation has generally the same clinical effects as a lesion with respect to the improvement of clinical disability, but has more advantages such as its adjustability and reversibility. To this day, fundamental knowledge regarding the application of electrical currents to deep brain structures is far from complete. Despite improving key symptoms in movement disorders, DBS can be associated with the occurrence of a variety of changes in cognitive and limbic functions both in humans and animals. Furthermore, in psychiatric disorders, DBS is primarily used to evoke cognitive and limbic changes to reduce the psychiatric disability. Preclinical DBS experiments have been carried out to investigate the mechanisms underlying the clinical effects of DBS for at least three (interrelated) reasons: to increase our scientific knowledge, to optimize/refine the technology, or to prevent/reduce side effects. In this review, we will discuss the behavioural effects of DBS in experimental neurological and psychiatric disorders.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227908
ISBN
ISI Accession Number ID
Series/Report no.Advances in behavioral biology ; v. 58

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSesia, T-
dc.contributor.authorTan, S-
dc.contributor.authorVlamings, R-
dc.contributor.authorLim, LW-
dc.contributor.authorVisser-Vandewalle, V-
dc.contributor.authorTemel , Y-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-25T02:00:23Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-25T02:00:23Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationThe 9th Triennial Meeting of the International-Basal-Ganglia-Society, Egmond aan Zee, Netherlands, 2-6 September 2007. In The Basal Ganglia IX, 2009, p. 471-482-
dc.identifier.isbn9781441903396-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227908-
dc.description.abstractThe use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to control severely disabling neurological and psychiatric conditions is an exciting and fast emerging area of neuroscience. Deep brain stimulation has generally the same clinical effects as a lesion with respect to the improvement of clinical disability, but has more advantages such as its adjustability and reversibility. To this day, fundamental knowledge regarding the application of electrical currents to deep brain structures is far from complete. Despite improving key symptoms in movement disorders, DBS can be associated with the occurrence of a variety of changes in cognitive and limbic functions both in humans and animals. Furthermore, in psychiatric disorders, DBS is primarily used to evoke cognitive and limbic changes to reduce the psychiatric disability. Preclinical DBS experiments have been carried out to investigate the mechanisms underlying the clinical effects of DBS for at least three (interrelated) reasons: to increase our scientific knowledge, to optimize/refine the technology, or to prevent/reduce side effects. In this review, we will discuss the behavioural effects of DBS in experimental neurological and psychiatric disorders.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer.-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Basal Ganglia IX-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAdvances in behavioral biology ; v. 58-
dc.titleBasal Ganglia and Behaviour: Behavioural Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation in Experimental Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailLim, LW: limlw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLim, LW=rp02088-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4419-0340-2_36-
dc.identifier.spage471-
dc.identifier.epage482-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000273461800036-
dc.publisher.placeDordrecht ; New York-

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