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Article: Taxis, Traffic, and Thoroughfares: The Politics of Transportation Infrastructure in China's Rapid Urbanization in the Reform Era

TitleTaxis, Traffic, and Thoroughfares: The Politics of Transportation Infrastructure in China's Rapid Urbanization in the Reform Era
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1548-744X
Citation
City & Society, 2016, v. 28 n. 3, p. 411-436 How to Cite?
AbstractCities have expanded both territorially and demographically at an unprecedented speed during the recent intense process of urbanization in China. This article investigates the material, discursive, and social dimensions of an infrastructural process that has been interwoven with the discourse and practice of urban development in the city of Guangzhou since the 1990s. It takes a 2007 public hearing concerning the short supply of taxis on workdays as an entry point into the politics of urban infrastructure, threading together long-term changes in urban forms, the ritual dimensions of the public hearing, and taxi drivers' downward mobility. The issue at the heart of this public hearing is a pattern of traffic flow caused by intense urbanization in the late Reform period that has led to important structural tensions in everyday life. Yet, under the official ideology of urban development, these structural tensions are de-humanized and rendered a mere technical issue of supply and shortage. In present-day China, infrastructural projects are regarded as technological solutions to a wide range of social and political issues in the process of urbanization; yet their material results often simply make these issues invisible instead.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227696
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.358

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, J-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-18T09:12:18Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-18T09:12:18Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationCity & Society, 2016, v. 28 n. 3, p. 411-436-
dc.identifier.issn0893-0465-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227696-
dc.description.abstractCities have expanded both territorially and demographically at an unprecedented speed during the recent intense process of urbanization in China. This article investigates the material, discursive, and social dimensions of an infrastructural process that has been interwoven with the discourse and practice of urban development in the city of Guangzhou since the 1990s. It takes a 2007 public hearing concerning the short supply of taxis on workdays as an entry point into the politics of urban infrastructure, threading together long-term changes in urban forms, the ritual dimensions of the public hearing, and taxi drivers' downward mobility. The issue at the heart of this public hearing is a pattern of traffic flow caused by intense urbanization in the late Reform period that has led to important structural tensions in everyday life. Yet, under the official ideology of urban development, these structural tensions are de-humanized and rendered a mere technical issue of supply and shortage. In present-day China, infrastructural projects are regarded as technological solutions to a wide range of social and political issues in the process of urbanization; yet their material results often simply make these issues invisible instead.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1548-744X-
dc.relation.ispartofCity & Society-
dc.titleTaxis, Traffic, and Thoroughfares: The Politics of Transportation Infrastructure in China's Rapid Urbanization in the Reform Era-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, J: jzhang02@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, J=rp01879-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ciso.12099-
dc.identifier.hkuros259178-
dc.identifier.volume28-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage411-
dc.identifier.epage436-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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