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Article: Isotopic records from archeological giant clams reveal a variable climate during the southwestern Pacific colonization ca. 3.0 ka BP

TitleIsotopic records from archeological giant clams reveal a variable climate during the southwestern Pacific colonization ca. 3.0 ka BP
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherElsevier. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/palaeo
Citation
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 2014, v. 404, p. 97-108 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Lapita colonization, which occurred in the late Holocene, is one of the most remarkable prehistorical human colonizations. To explore the possible influence of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on this event, bulk oxygen (δ 18 O shell ) and carbon (δ 13 C shell ) stable isotope records were obtained from eight fossil Tridacna sp. and Hippopus hippopus giant clams, unearthed from Lapita archeological sites of New Caledonia and Vanuatu. These giant clams were dated ca. 3.8–2.3 ka BP. These δ 18 O shell and δ 13 C shell records were used as proxies for com- bined sea surface temperature and salinity and precipitation. In addition, geochemical records were obtained from modern conspecifics from New Caledonia to create a baseline against which fossil giant clam records could be compared. The isotopic records revealed the occurrence of two distinct climate states in New Caledonia ca. 3.2–2.3 ka BP: one climate state was characterized by climatic conditions similar to those observed today and the second was comparable to warmer and wetter conditions similar to Vanuatu's modern climate. Considering that previous paleo-climate reconstructions in the West Pacific did not show a shift of the mean climatic state and that they revealed a weak centennial climate variability, our results suggest that the climatic mean state has been alternating between these two states at a decadal or an inter-annual frequency. This strong climate variability recorded in the giant clam shells may reflect an increase in the ENSO variability, supporting the hypothesis of an ENSO-forced Lapita colonization as suggested by Anderson et al. (2006).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227661

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDuprey, NN-
dc.contributor.authorGalipaud, JC-
dc.contributor.authorCabioch, G-
dc.contributor.authorLazareth, CE-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-18T09:12:06Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-18T09:12:06Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationPalaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 2014, v. 404, p. 97-108-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227661-
dc.description.abstractThe Lapita colonization, which occurred in the late Holocene, is one of the most remarkable prehistorical human colonizations. To explore the possible influence of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on this event, bulk oxygen (δ 18 O shell ) and carbon (δ 13 C shell ) stable isotope records were obtained from eight fossil Tridacna sp. and Hippopus hippopus giant clams, unearthed from Lapita archeological sites of New Caledonia and Vanuatu. These giant clams were dated ca. 3.8–2.3 ka BP. These δ 18 O shell and δ 13 C shell records were used as proxies for com- bined sea surface temperature and salinity and precipitation. In addition, geochemical records were obtained from modern conspecifics from New Caledonia to create a baseline against which fossil giant clam records could be compared. The isotopic records revealed the occurrence of two distinct climate states in New Caledonia ca. 3.2–2.3 ka BP: one climate state was characterized by climatic conditions similar to those observed today and the second was comparable to warmer and wetter conditions similar to Vanuatu's modern climate. Considering that previous paleo-climate reconstructions in the West Pacific did not show a shift of the mean climatic state and that they revealed a weak centennial climate variability, our results suggest that the climatic mean state has been alternating between these two states at a decadal or an inter-annual frequency. This strong climate variability recorded in the giant clam shells may reflect an increase in the ENSO variability, supporting the hypothesis of an ENSO-forced Lapita colonization as suggested by Anderson et al. (2006).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/palaeo-
dc.relation.ispartofPalaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology-
dc.rightsPosting accepted manuscript (postprint): © <year>. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.titleIsotopic records from archeological giant clams reveal a variable climate during the southwestern Pacific colonization ca. 3.0 ka BP-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailDuprey, NN: nduprey@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.palaeo.2014.04.002-
dc.identifier.hkuros259701-
dc.identifier.volume404-
dc.identifier.spage97-
dc.identifier.epage108-

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