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Conference Paper: Survey on practice of informed consent for implant treatment in Hong Kong

TitleSurvey on practice of informed consent for implant treatment in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdr.sagepub.com/
Citation
The 94th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR, 3rd Meeting of the IADR Asia Pacific Region & 35th Annual Meeting of the IADR Korean Division, Seoul, Korea, 22-25 June 2016. In Journal of Dental Research, 2016, v. 95 Spec. Iss. B, abstract no. 1412 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To describe the practice of informed consent for dental implant treatment by dentists in Hong Kong. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire including 12 questions on demographic background of respondents and 22 questions on informed consent in relation to dental implant treatment was sent to 518 systematically selected dentists registered with the Dental Council of Hong Kong. The returned questionnaires were detached by an independent person. Differences in the background characteristics between dentists who practiced implant dentistry and those who did not were assessed by Chi-square tests. Differences in mean number of missed items in the informed consent among dentists of different background characteristics were assessed by 1-way ANOVA. The level of significance was set at 0.05. RESULTS: A total of 224 completed questionnaires were received with a response rate of 48.8%. Seventeen out of 21 items of the informed consent were covered verbally by the majority of the respondents (>70%). Obtaining a signed informed consent was uncommon among the respondents (<10%) for most of the items. Over one-third of the respondents (38.4%) did not include the choice of implants or bone graft materials in the informed consent. Dentists with <5 years’ experience, working in a group practice or practicing only surgical/prosthetic phase showed significant higher mean number of missed items in the informed consent (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Most Hong Kong dentists obtained only verbal informed consent before implant treatment. The coverage in the informed consent was related to the dentist’s experience, type of practice and implant practice profile.
DescriptionPoster Session - Implantology Research: in vivo studies: no. 1412
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227490
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYou, D-
dc.contributor.authorPow, EHN-
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECM-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-18T09:11:01Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-18T09:11:01Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe 94th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR, 3rd Meeting of the IADR Asia Pacific Region & 35th Annual Meeting of the IADR Korean Division, Seoul, Korea, 22-25 June 2016. In Journal of Dental Research, 2016, v. 95 Spec. Iss. B, abstract no. 1412-
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227490-
dc.descriptionPoster Session - Implantology Research: in vivo studies: no. 1412-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To describe the practice of informed consent for dental implant treatment by dentists in Hong Kong. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire including 12 questions on demographic background of respondents and 22 questions on informed consent in relation to dental implant treatment was sent to 518 systematically selected dentists registered with the Dental Council of Hong Kong. The returned questionnaires were detached by an independent person. Differences in the background characteristics between dentists who practiced implant dentistry and those who did not were assessed by Chi-square tests. Differences in mean number of missed items in the informed consent among dentists of different background characteristics were assessed by 1-way ANOVA. The level of significance was set at 0.05. RESULTS: A total of 224 completed questionnaires were received with a response rate of 48.8%. Seventeen out of 21 items of the informed consent were covered verbally by the majority of the respondents (>70%). Obtaining a signed informed consent was uncommon among the respondents (<10%) for most of the items. Over one-third of the respondents (38.4%) did not include the choice of implants or bone graft materials in the informed consent. Dentists with <5 years’ experience, working in a group practice or practicing only surgical/prosthetic phase showed significant higher mean number of missed items in the informed consent (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Most Hong Kong dentists obtained only verbal informed consent before implant treatment. The coverage in the informed consent was related to the dentist’s experience, type of practice and implant practice profile.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdr.sagepub.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Research-
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.titleSurvey on practice of informed consent for implant treatment in Hong Kong-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailPow, EHN: ehnpow@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM: edward-lo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityPow, EHN=rp00030-
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015-
dc.identifier.hkuros259177-
dc.identifier.hkuros259744-
dc.identifier.volume95-
dc.identifier.issueSpec. Iss. B-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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