File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Workplace health promotion: assessing the cardiopulmonary risks of the construction workforce in Hong Kong

TitleWorkplace health promotion: assessing the cardiopulmonary risks of the construction workforce in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2016, v. 11 n. 1, p. e0146286 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective Health needs of different employee subgroups within an industry can differ. We report the results of a workplace cardiopulmonary risk assessment targeting workers and support staff in the construction industry. Methods A free worksite-based cardiopulmonary risk assessment for 1,903 workers on infrastructural contracts across Hong Kong was initiated in May 2014. Cardiopulmonary risk screening was performed in 60-minute blocks for approximately 30 workers/block with individualized feedback and lifestyle counseling. Risk profiles stratified by occupational roles are differentiated using the χ2-test for categorical and Student’s t-test for continuous variables. Results Most construction workers and clerks/professionals were male (83.2% and 71.2%, respectively) and Chinese (78.7% and 90.9%, respectively). Construction workers were older (mean: 44.9 years, SD 11.5) and less well-educated (6.1% received tertiary education) than clerks/professionals (35.0 years, 10.7; 72.6% received tertiary education), but more likely to be hypertensive (22.6% vs. 15.4%, p<0.001), overweight/obese (71.7% vs. 56.6%, p<0.001), centrally obese (53.1% vs. 35.5%, p<0.001), and have undesirable levels of high-density lipoprotein (41.6% vs. 35.8%, p<0.05) and diabetic levels of non-fasting blood glucose (4.3% vs. 1.6%, p<0.05). Up to 12.6% of construction workers and 9.7% of office clerks/professions had three or more metabolic syndrome risk factors. While construction workers were more likely than clerks/professionals to be daily smokers, they reported better work-related physical activity and diet. Conclusions Simple worksite health risk screening can identify potentially high-cardiopulmonary-risk construction industry employee subgroups for onward confirmatory referral. Separate cardiopulmonary health promotion strategies that account for the varying lifestyle profiles of the two employee subgroups in the industry appear justified.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227078
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTin, SPP-
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWT-
dc.contributor.authorYoon, SW-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, N-
dc.contributor.authorXia, N-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, W-
dc.contributor.authorMa, K-
dc.contributor.authorFielding, R-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-18T09:08:16Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-18T09:08:16Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE, 2016, v. 11 n. 1, p. e0146286-
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227078-
dc.description.abstractObjective Health needs of different employee subgroups within an industry can differ. We report the results of a workplace cardiopulmonary risk assessment targeting workers and support staff in the construction industry. Methods A free worksite-based cardiopulmonary risk assessment for 1,903 workers on infrastructural contracts across Hong Kong was initiated in May 2014. Cardiopulmonary risk screening was performed in 60-minute blocks for approximately 30 workers/block with individualized feedback and lifestyle counseling. Risk profiles stratified by occupational roles are differentiated using the χ2-test for categorical and Student’s t-test for continuous variables. Results Most construction workers and clerks/professionals were male (83.2% and 71.2%, respectively) and Chinese (78.7% and 90.9%, respectively). Construction workers were older (mean: 44.9 years, SD 11.5) and less well-educated (6.1% received tertiary education) than clerks/professionals (35.0 years, 10.7; 72.6% received tertiary education), but more likely to be hypertensive (22.6% vs. 15.4%, p<0.001), overweight/obese (71.7% vs. 56.6%, p<0.001), centrally obese (53.1% vs. 35.5%, p<0.001), and have undesirable levels of high-density lipoprotein (41.6% vs. 35.8%, p<0.05) and diabetic levels of non-fasting blood glucose (4.3% vs. 1.6%, p<0.05). Up to 12.6% of construction workers and 9.7% of office clerks/professions had three or more metabolic syndrome risk factors. While construction workers were more likely than clerks/professionals to be daily smokers, they reported better work-related physical activity and diet. Conclusions Simple worksite health risk screening can identify potentially high-cardiopulmonary-risk construction industry employee subgroups for onward confirmatory referral. Separate cardiopulmonary health promotion strategies that account for the varying lifestyle profiles of the two employee subgroups in the industry appear justified.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleWorkplace health promotion: assessing the cardiopulmonary risks of the construction workforce in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTin, SPP: pamtin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT: wwtlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R: fielding@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443-
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0146286-
dc.identifier.pmid26799393-
dc.identifier.hkuros259815-
dc.identifier.volume11-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagee0146286-
dc.identifier.epagee0146286-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000368655300018-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats