File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Geographies of Social Capital: Catastrophe Experience, Risk Perception, and the Transformation of Social Space in Postearthquake Resettlements in Sichuan, China

TitleGeographies of Social Capital: Catastrophe Experience, Risk Perception, and the Transformation of Social Space in Postearthquake Resettlements in Sichuan, China
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00045608.asp
Citation
Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 2016, v. 106 n. 4, p. 874-890 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article explores the relationships between catastrophe experience and risk perception, social interaction, and household response to future catastrophes. Our main argument recognizes the geographical context in which social capital is formed and reproduced. Social relationships and norms adjust to the social landscape, which can be transformed by the spatial consequences of natural catastrophes. We therefore argue that sources of household resilience could be derived from the spatial transformation of social practices and not necessarily from catastrophe experience and risk perception directly. A case study was conducted in two postearthquake rural communities in China. The inquiry is primarily based on a household survey of 371 local residents and is further supported by an analysis of additional in-depth interviews and a review of key changes in the neighborhoods under study. The findings challenge the assumption that catastrophe experience and risk perception are related to residents' intentions to prepare for future catastrophes. Nonetheless, the relationship might be mediated by social relationships and social norms. Catastrophe experience and risk perception can be construed as a geographical contextual factor. Further analysis provides one example of such a factor: The spatial features of postearthquake resettlements have increased the proximity between residents. This shift facilitates neighborly interaction and risk communication across a neighborhood. We discuss the nonlinear, dynamic relationships between the variables examined and the grounding of social capital in space.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226578
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.756
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.896

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, AYH-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, LTO-
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-17T07:45:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-17T07:45:00Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationAnnals of the Association of American Geographers, 2016, v. 106 n. 4, p. 874-890-
dc.identifier.issn0004-5608-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/226578-
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the relationships between catastrophe experience and risk perception, social interaction, and household response to future catastrophes. Our main argument recognizes the geographical context in which social capital is formed and reproduced. Social relationships and norms adjust to the social landscape, which can be transformed by the spatial consequences of natural catastrophes. We therefore argue that sources of household resilience could be derived from the spatial transformation of social practices and not necessarily from catastrophe experience and risk perception directly. A case study was conducted in two postearthquake rural communities in China. The inquiry is primarily based on a household survey of 371 local residents and is further supported by an analysis of additional in-depth interviews and a review of key changes in the neighborhoods under study. The findings challenge the assumption that catastrophe experience and risk perception are related to residents' intentions to prepare for future catastrophes. Nonetheless, the relationship might be mediated by social relationships and social norms. Catastrophe experience and risk perception can be construed as a geographical contextual factor. Further analysis provides one example of such a factor: The spatial features of postearthquake resettlements have increased the proximity between residents. This shift facilitates neighborly interaction and risk communication across a neighborhood. We discuss the nonlinear, dynamic relationships between the variables examined and the grounding of social capital in space.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00045608.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of the Association of American Geographers-
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Annals of the Association of American Geographers on 18 Apr 2016, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/24694452.2016.1159502-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License-
dc.titleGeographies of Social Capital: Catastrophe Experience, Risk Perception, and the Transformation of Social Space in Postearthquake Resettlements in Sichuan, China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLo, AYH: alexloyh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLo, AYH=rp02023-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/24694452.2016.1159502-
dc.identifier.hkuros258244-
dc.identifier.volume106-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage874-
dc.identifier.epage890-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats