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Article: Taste intensity modulates effective connectivity from the insular cortex to the thalamus in humans

TitleTaste intensity modulates effective connectivity from the insular cortex to the thalamus in humans
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherElsevier. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
Citation
NeuroImage, 2016, v. 135, p. 214-222 How to Cite?
AbstractEvaluation of taste intensity is one of the most important perceptual abilities in our daily life. In contrast with extensive research findings regarding the spatial representation of taste in the insula and thalamus, little is known about how the thalamus and insula communicate and reciprocally influence their activities for processing taste intensity. To examine this neurophysiological relationship, we investigated the modulatory effect of intensity of saltiness on connections in the network processing taste signals in the human brain. These “effective connectivity” relationships refer to the neurophysiological influence (including direction and strength of influence) of one brain region on another. Healthy adults (N = 34), including 17 males and 17 females (mean age = 21.3 years, SD = 2.4; mean body mass index (BMI) = 20.2 kg/m2, SD = 2.1) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging as they tasted three concentrations of sodium chloride solutions. By effective connectivity analysis with dynamic causal modeling, we show that taste intensity enhances top-down signal transmission from the insular cortex to the thalamus. These results are the first to demonstrate the modulatory effect of taste intensity on the taste network in the human brain.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225605

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, AWK-
dc.contributor.authorTanabe, HC-
dc.contributor.authorSuen, JLK-
dc.contributor.authorGoto, T-
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:09:17Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:09:17Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationNeuroImage, 2016, v. 135, p. 214-222-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225605-
dc.description.abstractEvaluation of taste intensity is one of the most important perceptual abilities in our daily life. In contrast with extensive research findings regarding the spatial representation of taste in the insula and thalamus, little is known about how the thalamus and insula communicate and reciprocally influence their activities for processing taste intensity. To examine this neurophysiological relationship, we investigated the modulatory effect of intensity of saltiness on connections in the network processing taste signals in the human brain. These “effective connectivity” relationships refer to the neurophysiological influence (including direction and strength of influence) of one brain region on another. Healthy adults (N = 34), including 17 males and 17 females (mean age = 21.3 years, SD = 2.4; mean body mass index (BMI) = 20.2 kg/m2, SD = 2.1) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging as they tasted three concentrations of sodium chloride solutions. By effective connectivity analysis with dynamic causal modeling, we show that taste intensity enhances top-down signal transmission from the insular cortex to the thalamus. These results are the first to demonstrate the modulatory effect of taste intensity on the taste network in the human brain.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg-
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImage-
dc.rightsPosting accepted manuscript (postprint): © <year>. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.titleTaste intensity modulates effective connectivity from the insular cortex to the thalamus in humans-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYeung, AWK: ndyeung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailGoto, T: gototk@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, AWK=rp02143-
dc.identifier.authorityGoto, T=rp01434-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.04.057-
dc.identifier.hkuros257982-
dc.identifier.volume135-
dc.identifier.spage214-
dc.identifier.epage222-

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