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Article: Clinicopathological concordance of dementia diagnoses by community versus tertiary care clinicians

TitleClinicopathological concordance of dementia diagnoses by community versus tertiary care clinicians
Authors
KeywordsAlzheimer's disease
Autopsy
Cerebrovascular disease
Clinical audit
Dementia
Issue Date2004
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://aja.sagepub.com
Citation
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias, 2004, v. 19 n. 3, p. 161-165 How to Cite?
AbstractSubjects enrolled in the Autopsy Program at the University of Southern California Alzheimer's Disease Research Center may receive clinical diagnoses from primary care providers in the community or from specialists in neurology. We reviewed the autopsy concordance rates for 463 subjects for diagnoses made by both groups of clinicians. Seventy-seven percent of the sample met neuropathological criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The overall diagnostic accuracy for this sample was 81 percent. Neurologists assessed 200 of the subjects (43 percent). The diagnostic accuracy for any clinical diagnosis among the non-neurologists was 84 percent, and 78 percent (p = 0.07) among neurologists. For AD, non-neurologists had a diagnostic concordance rate of 91 percent and neurologists 87 percent. Where neuropathological AD was missed, non-neurologists had failed to detect any cognitive impairment; neurologists had diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Erroneous clinical diagnoses of AD missed dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) or AD concurrent with Parkinson's disease (PD). Our findings identify specific foci for improving clinical diagnosis of dementia among all physicians managing dementia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225573
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.614
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.577
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, W-
dc.contributor.authorChow, TW-
dc.contributor.authorZheng, L-
dc.contributor.authorMack, WJ-
dc.contributor.authorMiller, C-
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T06:22:03Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T06:22:03Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias, 2004, v. 19 n. 3, p. 161-165-
dc.identifier.issn1533-3175-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225573-
dc.description.abstractSubjects enrolled in the Autopsy Program at the University of Southern California Alzheimer's Disease Research Center may receive clinical diagnoses from primary care providers in the community or from specialists in neurology. We reviewed the autopsy concordance rates for 463 subjects for diagnoses made by both groups of clinicians. Seventy-seven percent of the sample met neuropathological criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The overall diagnostic accuracy for this sample was 81 percent. Neurologists assessed 200 of the subjects (43 percent). The diagnostic accuracy for any clinical diagnosis among the non-neurologists was 84 percent, and 78 percent (p = 0.07) among neurologists. For AD, non-neurologists had a diagnostic concordance rate of 91 percent and neurologists 87 percent. Where neuropathological AD was missed, non-neurologists had failed to detect any cognitive impairment; neurologists had diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Erroneous clinical diagnoses of AD missed dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) or AD concurrent with Parkinson's disease (PD). Our findings identify specific foci for improving clinical diagnosis of dementia among all physicians managing dementia.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://aja.sagepub.com-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias-
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectAlzheimer's disease-
dc.subjectAutopsy-
dc.subjectCerebrovascular disease-
dc.subjectClinical audit-
dc.subjectDementia-
dc.titleClinicopathological concordance of dementia diagnoses by community versus tertiary care clinicians-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/153331750401900309-
dc.identifier.pmid15214202-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1626585-
dc.identifier.volume19-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage161-
dc.identifier.epage165-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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