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Article: Added sugar intake that exceeds current recommendations is associated with nutrient dilution in older Australians

TitleAdded sugar intake that exceeds current recommendations is associated with nutrient dilution in older Australians
Authors
KeywordsAdded sugar intake
Blue Mountains Eye Study
Energy from added sugar
Nutrient dilution
Older adults
Issue Date2016
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nut
Citation
Nutrition, 2016 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: A nutrient dilution effect of diets high in added sugar has been reported in some older populations, but the evidence is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between added sugar intakes (according to recommended guidelines) and nutrient intake, food consumption, and body mass index (BMI). METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis of data collected between 2007 and 2009 from participants of the Blue Mountains Eye study 4 was performed (n = 879). Dietary intake was assessed using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Added sugar content of foods was determined by applying a systematic step-wise method. BMI was calculated from measured weight and height. Food and nutrient intakes and BMI were assessed according to categories of percentage energy from added sugar (EAS% < 5%, EAS% = 5%-10%, and EAS% >10%) using analysis of covariance for multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Micronutrient intake including retinol equivalents, vitamins B6, B12, C, E, and D, and minerals including calcium, iron, and magnesium showed a significant inverse association with EAS% intakes (Ptrend < 0.05). In people with the lowest intake of added sugars (<5% energy) intake of alcohol, fruits, and vegetables were higher and intake of sugar sweetened beverages was lower compared to other participants (all Ptrend < 0.001). BMI was similar between the three EAS% categories. CONCLUSIONS: Energy intake from added sugar greater than the recommended level of 10% is associated with lower micronutrient intakes, indicating micronutrient dilution. Conversely, added sugar intakes <5% of energy intake are associated with higher micronutrient intakes. This information may inform dietary messages targeted at optimizing diet quality in older adults.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225483
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.839
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.085

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMoshtaghian, H-
dc.contributor.authorLouie, CYJ-
dc.contributor.authorCharlton, KE-
dc.contributor.authorProbst, YC-
dc.contributor.authorGopinath, B-
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, P-
dc.contributor.authorFlood, VM-
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-18T01:58:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-18T01:58:00Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationNutrition, 2016-
dc.identifier.issn0899-9007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225483-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: A nutrient dilution effect of diets high in added sugar has been reported in some older populations, but the evidence is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between added sugar intakes (according to recommended guidelines) and nutrient intake, food consumption, and body mass index (BMI). METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis of data collected between 2007 and 2009 from participants of the Blue Mountains Eye study 4 was performed (n = 879). Dietary intake was assessed using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Added sugar content of foods was determined by applying a systematic step-wise method. BMI was calculated from measured weight and height. Food and nutrient intakes and BMI were assessed according to categories of percentage energy from added sugar (EAS% < 5%, EAS% = 5%-10%, and EAS% >10%) using analysis of covariance for multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Micronutrient intake including retinol equivalents, vitamins B6, B12, C, E, and D, and minerals including calcium, iron, and magnesium showed a significant inverse association with EAS% intakes (Ptrend < 0.05). In people with the lowest intake of added sugars (<5% energy) intake of alcohol, fruits, and vegetables were higher and intake of sugar sweetened beverages was lower compared to other participants (all Ptrend < 0.001). BMI was similar between the three EAS% categories. CONCLUSIONS: Energy intake from added sugar greater than the recommended level of 10% is associated with lower micronutrient intakes, indicating micronutrient dilution. Conversely, added sugar intakes <5% of energy intake are associated with higher micronutrient intakes. This information may inform dietary messages targeted at optimizing diet quality in older adults.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nut-
dc.relation.ispartofNutrition-
dc.rightsPosting accepted manuscript (postprint): © <year>. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.subjectAdded sugar intake-
dc.subjectBlue Mountains Eye Study-
dc.subjectEnergy from added sugar-
dc.subjectNutrient dilution-
dc.subjectOlder adults-
dc.titleAdded sugar intake that exceeds current recommendations is associated with nutrient dilution in older Australians-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLouie, CYJ: h0115648@graduate.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLouie, CYJ=rp02118-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nut.2016.02.004-
dc.identifier.pmid27155956-
dc.identifier.hkuros258409-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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