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Article: Frequency of takeaway food consumption and its association with major food group consumption, anthropometric measures and blood pressure during adolescence

TitleFrequency of takeaway food consumption and its association with major food group consumption, anthropometric measures and blood pressure during adolescence
Authors
KeywordsAdolescence
BP blood pressure
Children
Cohorts
Fruits
Socio-economic staus
Takeaway foods
Vegetables
Issue Date2016
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BJN
Citation
The British Journal of Nutrition, 2016, v. 115 n. 11, p. 2025-2030 How to Cite?
AbstractWe prospectively assessed the (1) frequency and socio-economic correlates of takeaway food consumption during adolescence; and (2) association between frequent takeaway food consumption with intakes of major food groups and anthropometric measures and blood pressure (BP). In total, 699 Sydney schoolchildren (380 girls and 319 boys) who had dietary data at both 12 and 17 years of age were included for analyses. Takeaway food consumption was self-reported and based on a single question. Anthropometric measures and BP were collected. The proportion of participants who ate takeaway foods once per week or more increased significantly over 5 years from the age of 12 to 17 years: 35·5-44·1 % (P<0·0001). In total, 12-year-old girls compared with boys had reduced odds of takeaway foods once per week or more at the age of 17 years (P=0·01), multivariable-adjusted OR 0·63 (95 % CI 0·44, 0·90). In total, 12-year-old children who ate takeaway foods once per week or more had significantly lower mean fruit (220·3 v. 253·0 g/d; P=0·03) and vegetable consumption (213·2 v. 247·7 g/d; P=0·004), 5 years later (at 17 years of age). Frequent takeaway food consumption at the age of 12 years was not associated with anthropometric indices and BP at the age of 17 years. Consumption of takeaway foods became more frequent during adolescence, particularly among boys, and it was associated with reduced intake of fruits and vegetables.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225473
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.311
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.587

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGopinath, B-
dc.contributor.authorFlood, VM-
dc.contributor.authorBurlutsky, G-
dc.contributor.authorLouie, CYJ-
dc.contributor.authorBaur, LA-
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, P-
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-17T09:25:33Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-17T09:25:33Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationThe British Journal of Nutrition, 2016, v. 115 n. 11, p. 2025-2030-
dc.identifier.issn0007-1145-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225473-
dc.description.abstractWe prospectively assessed the (1) frequency and socio-economic correlates of takeaway food consumption during adolescence; and (2) association between frequent takeaway food consumption with intakes of major food groups and anthropometric measures and blood pressure (BP). In total, 699 Sydney schoolchildren (380 girls and 319 boys) who had dietary data at both 12 and 17 years of age were included for analyses. Takeaway food consumption was self-reported and based on a single question. Anthropometric measures and BP were collected. The proportion of participants who ate takeaway foods once per week or more increased significantly over 5 years from the age of 12 to 17 years: 35·5-44·1 % (P<0·0001). In total, 12-year-old girls compared with boys had reduced odds of takeaway foods once per week or more at the age of 17 years (P=0·01), multivariable-adjusted OR 0·63 (95 % CI 0·44, 0·90). In total, 12-year-old children who ate takeaway foods once per week or more had significantly lower mean fruit (220·3 v. 253·0 g/d; P=0·03) and vegetable consumption (213·2 v. 247·7 g/d; P=0·004), 5 years later (at 17 years of age). Frequent takeaway food consumption at the age of 12 years was not associated with anthropometric indices and BP at the age of 17 years. Consumption of takeaway foods became more frequent during adolescence, particularly among boys, and it was associated with reduced intake of fruits and vegetables.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BJN-
dc.relation.ispartofThe British Journal of Nutrition-
dc.rightsThe British Journal of Nutrition. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.subjectAdolescence-
dc.subjectBP blood pressure-
dc.subjectChildren-
dc.subjectCohorts-
dc.subjectFruits-
dc.subjectSocio-economic staus-
dc.subjectTakeaway foods-
dc.subjectVegetables-
dc.titleFrequency of takeaway food consumption and its association with major food group consumption, anthropometric measures and blood pressure during adolescence-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLouie, CYJ: h0115648@graduate.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLouie, CYJ=rp02118-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/s000711451600101x-
dc.identifier.pmid27046032-
dc.identifier.hkuros258411-
dc.identifier.volume115-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.identifier.spage2025-
dc.identifier.epage2030-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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