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Article: Anthropometric Measurement of Patients Admitted to an Intensive Care Unit

TitleAnthropometric Measurement of Patients Admitted to an Intensive Care Unit
Authors
Issue Date2016
Citation
Journal of Preoperative and Critical Intensive Care Nursing, 2016, v. 2 n. 2, article no. 1000113 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Visual estimation is the usual method that many healthcare professional use to estimate the body weight of patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), but this method has been shown to be significantly inaccurate. This study aimed to explores the feasibility of using fibula length to estimate the acute body weight of patients admitted to an ICU. Methods The study collected all ICU records in which patient’s body weight was estimated by the equation: Males: 153.1 – (0.26 x age) – 11 + (1.05 x fibular length) Females: 153.1 – (0.26 x age) – 22 + (1.05 x fibular length). The body weight(BW) then estimated by: BW= 20 x [estimated body height (in metres)]2. The degree of agreement between the estimated body weight by anthropometric measurement methods and the actual recorded body weight in the patient’s medical record within the four weeks immediately before ICU admission were assessed by the Bland-Altman plot. Results Paired sample t-tests showed there were statistically significant differences between the patient’s estimated and actual height and weight (p-value = 0.0001 for both). Conclusions The study found the use of fibula length alone had a similar percentage of bias when compared with visual estimation by healthcare professionals to estimate the actual body weight of the patients admitted to ICU.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225013

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, WK-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, YC-
dc.contributor.authorChau, LS-
dc.contributor.authorMak, IIL-
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-18T03:35:20Z-
dc.date.available2016-04-18T03:35:20Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Preoperative and Critical Intensive Care Nursing, 2016, v. 2 n. 2, article no. 1000113-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/225013-
dc.description.abstractBackground Visual estimation is the usual method that many healthcare professional use to estimate the body weight of patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), but this method has been shown to be significantly inaccurate. This study aimed to explores the feasibility of using fibula length to estimate the acute body weight of patients admitted to an ICU. Methods The study collected all ICU records in which patient’s body weight was estimated by the equation: Males: 153.1 – (0.26 x age) – 11 + (1.05 x fibular length) Females: 153.1 – (0.26 x age) – 22 + (1.05 x fibular length). The body weight(BW) then estimated by: BW= 20 x [estimated body height (in metres)]2. The degree of agreement between the estimated body weight by anthropometric measurement methods and the actual recorded body weight in the patient’s medical record within the four weeks immediately before ICU admission were assessed by the Bland-Altman plot. Results Paired sample t-tests showed there were statistically significant differences between the patient’s estimated and actual height and weight (p-value = 0.0001 for both). Conclusions The study found the use of fibula length alone had a similar percentage of bias when compared with visual estimation by healthcare professionals to estimate the actual body weight of the patients admitted to ICU.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Preoperative and Critical Intensive Care Nursing-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleAnthropometric Measurement of Patients Admitted to an Intensive Care Unit-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, WK: alessi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, WK=rp01590-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.4172/jpcic.1000113-
dc.identifier.hkuros257645-

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