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Article: Anatomic resection for severe liver trauma

TitleAnatomic resection for severe liver trauma
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherThe Medicine Publishing Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.medicinepublishing.co.uk/index.php/surgery/
Citation
Surgery, 1998, v. 123, p. 251-257 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Most publications during the past decade have condemned the use of anatomic resection for liver trauma and advocated a conservative surgical approach when operative intervention was required. This policy has been supported by the high mortality rate reported by most authorities. The purpose of this study was to assess the results of anatomic hepatic resection for liver trauma in an institution in which the hepatobiliary surgeons are responsible for the management of severe liver injuries. METHODS: During the period 1983 to 1996, 287 patients with liver injuries were admitted to the hospital and 37 patients with severe liver trauma underwent anatomic resection. Demographic, clinical, operative, and postoperative data were collected and analyzed. The resections performed included right hemihepatectomy (n = 27), left hemihepatectomy (n = 1), left lateral segment resection (n = 5), and segmental resection (n = 4). RESULTS: There were three postoperative deaths after right hemihepatectomy (11.1%) and an overall mortality rate of 8.1%. There were no intraoperative deaths. Postoperative complications occurred in 22 patients (60%) and were most frequent in patients with concomitant injuries to other systems. Liver-related morbidity occurred in seven patients (19%). The median postoperative stay was 20 days. CONCLUSIONS: Anatomic hepatic resection for trauma is associated with low mortality and liver-related morbidity rates when performed by experienced hepatobiliary surgeons, and its role in the management of severe hepatic trauma should be reevaluated.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224532
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.160

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStrong, RW-
dc.contributor.authorLynch, SV-
dc.contributor.authorWall, DR-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, CL-
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-07T02:35:00Z-
dc.date.available2016-04-07T02:35:00Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationSurgery, 1998, v. 123, p. 251-257-
dc.identifier.issn0263-9319-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224532-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Most publications during the past decade have condemned the use of anatomic resection for liver trauma and advocated a conservative surgical approach when operative intervention was required. This policy has been supported by the high mortality rate reported by most authorities. The purpose of this study was to assess the results of anatomic hepatic resection for liver trauma in an institution in which the hepatobiliary surgeons are responsible for the management of severe liver injuries. METHODS: During the period 1983 to 1996, 287 patients with liver injuries were admitted to the hospital and 37 patients with severe liver trauma underwent anatomic resection. Demographic, clinical, operative, and postoperative data were collected and analyzed. The resections performed included right hemihepatectomy (n = 27), left hemihepatectomy (n = 1), left lateral segment resection (n = 5), and segmental resection (n = 4). RESULTS: There were three postoperative deaths after right hemihepatectomy (11.1%) and an overall mortality rate of 8.1%. There were no intraoperative deaths. Postoperative complications occurred in 22 patients (60%) and were most frequent in patients with concomitant injuries to other systems. Liver-related morbidity occurred in seven patients (19%). The median postoperative stay was 20 days. CONCLUSIONS: Anatomic hepatic resection for trauma is associated with low mortality and liver-related morbidity rates when performed by experienced hepatobiliary surgeons, and its role in the management of severe hepatic trauma should be reevaluated.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe Medicine Publishing Company. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.medicinepublishing.co.uk/index.php/surgery/-
dc.relation.ispartofSurgery-
dc.rightsPosting accepted manuscript (postprint): © <year>. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/-
dc.subject.meshHemorrhage - therapy-
dc.subject.meshHepatectomy - adverse effects - methods-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLiver - injuries - surgery-
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications-
dc.titleAnatomic resection for severe liver trauma-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLiu, CL: clliu@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0039-6060(98)70176-X-
dc.identifier.pmid9526515-
dc.identifier.hkuros36143-
dc.identifier.volume123-
dc.identifier.spage251-
dc.identifier.epage257-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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