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Article: Brief Sojourn in Your Native Land: Sydney Links with South China

TitleBrief Sojourn in Your Native Land: Sydney Links with South China
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherUniversity of Queensland Press.
Citation
Queensland Review, 1999, v. 6 n. 2, p. 11-23 How to Cite?
AbstractThe title of this paper is taken from a testimonial signed by a number of Gundagai residents on the departure for China in 1903 of Mark Loong after sixteen years in the district. That the notion of a person ‘sojourning’ in China is a contradiction of the prevailing ‘sojourner’ concept usually held about early Chinese migrants in Australia is the result the failure of Australian-Chinese research to fully appreciate the significance of family and district links between Australia and China and their impact upon the motivation, organisation and settlement patterns of Chinese people in Australia before the middle of the twentieth century. Without such an appreciation most research into Australian-Chinese history has focused only on those who established families in Australia or who ran successful businesses. This paper will focus on describing some features of these family and districts links with regard to that generation who arrived after the gold rushes of the 1850s to 1870s but before the Immigration Restriction Act 1901, who originated in one south China district, Zhongshan (中山), and who lived primarily in one Australian city, Sydney. These restraints are partly due to reliance on sources such as the administrative files of the Immigration Restriction Act which begin only in 1901, and partly to the fact that this research represents a first step in the investigation of the significance of district of origin and the people of Zhongshan district in Sydney are the first to be investigated.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224429
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, M-
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-05T04:07:59Z-
dc.date.available2016-04-05T04:07:59Z-
dc.date.issued1999-
dc.identifier.citationQueensland Review, 1999, v. 6 n. 2, p. 11-23-
dc.identifier.issn1321-8166-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224429-
dc.description.abstractThe title of this paper is taken from a testimonial signed by a number of Gundagai residents on the departure for China in 1903 of Mark Loong after sixteen years in the district. That the notion of a person ‘sojourning’ in China is a contradiction of the prevailing ‘sojourner’ concept usually held about early Chinese migrants in Australia is the result the failure of Australian-Chinese research to fully appreciate the significance of family and district links between Australia and China and their impact upon the motivation, organisation and settlement patterns of Chinese people in Australia before the middle of the twentieth century. Without such an appreciation most research into Australian-Chinese history has focused only on those who established families in Australia or who ran successful businesses. This paper will focus on describing some features of these family and districts links with regard to that generation who arrived after the gold rushes of the 1850s to 1870s but before the Immigration Restriction Act 1901, who originated in one south China district, Zhongshan (中山), and who lived primarily in one Australian city, Sydney. These restraints are partly due to reliance on sources such as the administrative files of the Immigration Restriction Act which begin only in 1901, and partly to the fact that this research represents a first step in the investigation of the significance of district of origin and the people of Zhongshan district in Sydney are the first to be investigated.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherUniversity of Queensland Press. -
dc.relation.ispartofQueensland Review-
dc.titleBrief Sojourn in Your Native Land: Sydney Links with South China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1321816600001112-
dc.identifier.hkuros48272-
dc.identifier.volume6-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage11-
dc.identifier.epage23-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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