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Conference Paper: Subgingival spirochete diversity among healthy and chronic periodontitis subjects

TitleSubgingival spirochete diversity among healthy and chronic periodontitis subjects
Authors
KeywordsPeriodontics
Microbiology
Pathogenicity
Phylogeny
Issue Date2010
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdr.sagepub.com/
Citation
The 24th IADR-SEA Division Annual Scientific Meeting, Taipei, Taiwan, 19-21 September 2010. In Journal of Dental Research, 2010, v. 89 n. Spec Iss C, p. Abstract no. 58 How to Cite?
AbstractNumerous studies have demonstrated a strong association between oral spirochetes and periodontal disease. Molecular analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences have shown that all oral spirochetes belong to the genus Treponema, of which there are 10 different ‘phylogroups'. Compared with healthy controls, diseased subjects have previously been shown to have greater diversity of subgingival treponeme species. However, a more detailed study is required to clarify this issue. Objectives: To compare the diversity of subgingival treponeme species among matched periodontally healthy and diseased subjects. Methods: Pooled subgingival plaque samples were collected from multiple deep pockets or sulci of five chronic periodontitis or periodontally-healthy subjects, respectively. Bacterial DNA was extracted and 16S rRNA genes were PCR-amplified using ‘treponeme-selective' primers. PCR products were cloned, and 50-60 clones from each subject were sequenced, to identify the ‘phylogroups' present. Results: In the periodontitis group, 65% of plasmid clones (179) contained treponeme 16S rRNA genes, which could be assigned to 8 different phylogroups. Sequence data from the healthy group indicated similar diversity of treponeme species. While the percentage of treponeme clones obtained was slightly lower (55%), all 8 groups present in diseased group could be found in healthy group. Group 1 treponemes (T. vincentii/T. medium) were the most abundant in both healthy (41%) and periodontitis subjects (45%). The majority of non-treponeme species identified were Deferribacteraceae, Flexistipes, Olsenella or Atopobium. Conclusions: Our results indicate there are no significant differences in the diversity of oral treponeme species in the sulcal/subgingival plaque of healthy or chronic periodontitis subjects.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224341
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYou, M-
dc.contributor.authorMo, S-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WK-
dc.contributor.authorWatt, RM-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-31T09:54:20Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-31T09:54:20Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationThe 24th IADR-SEA Division Annual Scientific Meeting, Taipei, Taiwan, 19-21 September 2010. In Journal of Dental Research, 2010, v. 89 n. Spec Iss C, p. Abstract no. 58-
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224341-
dc.description.abstractNumerous studies have demonstrated a strong association between oral spirochetes and periodontal disease. Molecular analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences have shown that all oral spirochetes belong to the genus Treponema, of which there are 10 different ‘phylogroups'. Compared with healthy controls, diseased subjects have previously been shown to have greater diversity of subgingival treponeme species. However, a more detailed study is required to clarify this issue. Objectives: To compare the diversity of subgingival treponeme species among matched periodontally healthy and diseased subjects. Methods: Pooled subgingival plaque samples were collected from multiple deep pockets or sulci of five chronic periodontitis or periodontally-healthy subjects, respectively. Bacterial DNA was extracted and 16S rRNA genes were PCR-amplified using ‘treponeme-selective' primers. PCR products were cloned, and 50-60 clones from each subject were sequenced, to identify the ‘phylogroups' present. Results: In the periodontitis group, 65% of plasmid clones (179) contained treponeme 16S rRNA genes, which could be assigned to 8 different phylogroups. Sequence data from the healthy group indicated similar diversity of treponeme species. While the percentage of treponeme clones obtained was slightly lower (55%), all 8 groups present in diseased group could be found in healthy group. Group 1 treponemes (T. vincentii/T. medium) were the most abundant in both healthy (41%) and periodontitis subjects (45%). The majority of non-treponeme species identified were Deferribacteraceae, Flexistipes, Olsenella or Atopobium. Conclusions: Our results indicate there are no significant differences in the diversity of oral treponeme species in the sulcal/subgingival plaque of healthy or chronic periodontitis subjects.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdr.sagepub.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Research-
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectPeriodontics-
dc.subjectMicrobiology-
dc.subjectPathogenicity-
dc.subjectPhylogeny-
dc.titleSubgingival spirochete diversity among healthy and chronic periodontitis subjects-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailYou, M: fiona_sen@yahoo.com.cn-
dc.identifier.emailMo, S: mosisu@126.com-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, WK: ewkleung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWatt, RM: rmwatt@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, WK=rp00019-
dc.identifier.authorityWatt, RM=rp00043-
dc.identifier.hkuros181628-
dc.identifier.volume89-
dc.identifier.issueSpec Iss C-
dc.identifier.spageAbstract no. 58-
dc.identifier.epageAbstract no. 58-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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