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Conference Paper: Dental hospital attenders' knowledge about periodontal diseases in Hong Kong

TitleDental hospital attenders' knowledge about periodontal diseases in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsSurvey
Periodontics
Periodontal disease
Issue Date2010
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdr.sagepub.com/
Citation
The 24th IADR-SEA Division Annual Scientific Meeting, Taipei, Taiwan, 19-21 September 2010. In Journal of Dental Research, 2010, v. 89 n. Spec Iss C, p. Abstract no. 101 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To collect information on knowledge about periodontal diseases and their management among patients attending the Prince Philip Dental Hospital (PPDH) in Hong Kong for enhancing effectiveness of oral hygiene instructions and achieving better periodontal treatment outcomes. Methods: Cross-sectional self-administered pilot-tested questionnaire survey of 500 adults (mean age 48.4 years, SD=14.6, 54% female) attending the PPDH selected by convenience sampling from January to July 2010. Results: 46% of the subjects claimed to know what gingivitis is while 64% knew about periodontitis. 92% reported that poor plaque control was the most important risk factor for periodontal diseases. Stress was recognized as a risk factor for periodontal diseases by 28% of the subjects. Among signs and symptoms of periodontal diseases, bleeding gums were recognized by over 90%, whereas 57% believed that drifting teeth was associated with periodontal diseases. 49% recognized that periodontal diseases are associated with general health, and a significant difference was found among subjects with different education levels (chi square test, p<0.05). 3% of the subjects thought that gum diseases increased the risk for preterm birth, 7% for heart diseases and 25% for diabetes. No significant difference was found between males and females (chi square test, p>0.05). For managing periodontal problems, the majority (92%) would consult a dentist and only 9% would consider consulting a Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioner. Conclusion: The patients investigated had inadequate knowledge about periodontal diseases and poor awareness of the risks, as well as lack of knowledge about the relationship between periodontal health and general health.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224235
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDarnaudet, JF-
dc.contributor.authorCorbet, EF-
dc.contributor.authorJin, LJ-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-30T04:41:12Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-30T04:41:12Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationThe 24th IADR-SEA Division Annual Scientific Meeting, Taipei, Taiwan, 19-21 September 2010. In Journal of Dental Research, 2010, v. 89 n. Spec Iss C, p. Abstract no. 101-
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224235-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To collect information on knowledge about periodontal diseases and their management among patients attending the Prince Philip Dental Hospital (PPDH) in Hong Kong for enhancing effectiveness of oral hygiene instructions and achieving better periodontal treatment outcomes. Methods: Cross-sectional self-administered pilot-tested questionnaire survey of 500 adults (mean age 48.4 years, SD=14.6, 54% female) attending the PPDH selected by convenience sampling from January to July 2010. Results: 46% of the subjects claimed to know what gingivitis is while 64% knew about periodontitis. 92% reported that poor plaque control was the most important risk factor for periodontal diseases. Stress was recognized as a risk factor for periodontal diseases by 28% of the subjects. Among signs and symptoms of periodontal diseases, bleeding gums were recognized by over 90%, whereas 57% believed that drifting teeth was associated with periodontal diseases. 49% recognized that periodontal diseases are associated with general health, and a significant difference was found among subjects with different education levels (chi square test, p<0.05). 3% of the subjects thought that gum diseases increased the risk for preterm birth, 7% for heart diseases and 25% for diabetes. No significant difference was found between males and females (chi square test, p>0.05). For managing periodontal problems, the majority (92%) would consult a dentist and only 9% would consider consulting a Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioner. Conclusion: The patients investigated had inadequate knowledge about periodontal diseases and poor awareness of the risks, as well as lack of knowledge about the relationship between periodontal health and general health.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://jdr.sagepub.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Research-
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectSurvey-
dc.subjectPeriodontics-
dc.subjectPeriodontal disease-
dc.titleDental hospital attenders' knowledge about periodontal diseases in Hong Kong-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailCorbet, EF: efcorbet@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailJin, LJ: ljjin@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCorbet, EF=rp00005-
dc.identifier.authorityJin, LJ=rp00028-
dc.identifier.hkuros181575-
dc.identifier.volume89-
dc.identifier.issueSpec Iss C-
dc.identifier.spageAbstract no. 101-
dc.identifier.epageAbstract no. 101-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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