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Article: A New Direction for Civic Education in Hong Kong SAR

TitleA New Direction for Civic Education in Hong Kong SAR
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherThe Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups. The Journal's web site is located at http://yrc.hkfyg.org.hk/eng/journal.html
Citation
Journal of Youth Studies, 1998, v. 1 n. 1, p. 151-158 How to Cite?
青年研究學報, 1998, v. 1 n. 1, p. 151-158 How to Cite?
AbstractAs a result of the reunification of Hong Kong with China, the national identity of Hong Kong citizens is needed to be redefined. However, due to more than one hundred and fifty years of colonial rule which foster an 'alien subject education' and the culture of 'bureaucratic politics' is enhanced. Hong Kong people, as a Chinese are unable to build up a sense of nationalism, though local schools had already conducted 'civics' as a separate subject in the 1930s. This subject was revised several times in content until it was renamed to EPA in 1965. However, the syllabus is very much emphasized on the knowledge of Government policy instead of promoting political participation. In fact, the Government has exercised tight control on the syllabus and curricula taught in schools. Until 1985, Education Department proposed the first 'Guidelines on Civic Education in Schools' which recommended schools to deliver civic education through hidden curriculum. Effects are subject to queries. Research findings confirm that young people are a group of idealistic observers who have inadequate knowledge and skills to involve in public affairs. However, democratization and de-colonization processes are further speed up, especially during the late transition period, Hong Kong people were able to directly elect their representatives in the three-tier political structure. These mass political campaigns and mobilization could further promote a sense of social consciousness among the younger generation. In fact, political participation is the best form of political education. The author proposes that the focus of civic education should be on both nationalistic and democratic themes. Besides, as participatory-oriented approach should be adopted so that young people could be provided with ample opportunities to participate in the decision making process on issues directly affecting their well-being. Whereas, the Government should be responsible to enhance a sense of openness and accountability in the bureaucracy and to develop a fairly elected and pro-democratic political structure so that citizens could effectively exercise their rights to monitor the government for the consolidation of the concept of 'One Country, Two Systems'.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224205
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, KH-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T08:34:03Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-29T08:34:03Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Youth Studies, 1998, v. 1 n. 1, p. 151-158-
dc.identifier.citation青年研究學報, 1998, v. 1 n. 1, p. 151-158-
dc.identifier.issn1029-7847-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/224205-
dc.description.abstractAs a result of the reunification of Hong Kong with China, the national identity of Hong Kong citizens is needed to be redefined. However, due to more than one hundred and fifty years of colonial rule which foster an 'alien subject education' and the culture of 'bureaucratic politics' is enhanced. Hong Kong people, as a Chinese are unable to build up a sense of nationalism, though local schools had already conducted 'civics' as a separate subject in the 1930s. This subject was revised several times in content until it was renamed to EPA in 1965. However, the syllabus is very much emphasized on the knowledge of Government policy instead of promoting political participation. In fact, the Government has exercised tight control on the syllabus and curricula taught in schools. Until 1985, Education Department proposed the first 'Guidelines on Civic Education in Schools' which recommended schools to deliver civic education through hidden curriculum. Effects are subject to queries. Research findings confirm that young people are a group of idealistic observers who have inadequate knowledge and skills to involve in public affairs. However, democratization and de-colonization processes are further speed up, especially during the late transition period, Hong Kong people were able to directly elect their representatives in the three-tier political structure. These mass political campaigns and mobilization could further promote a sense of social consciousness among the younger generation. In fact, political participation is the best form of political education. The author proposes that the focus of civic education should be on both nationalistic and democratic themes. Besides, as participatory-oriented approach should be adopted so that young people could be provided with ample opportunities to participate in the decision making process on issues directly affecting their well-being. Whereas, the Government should be responsible to enhance a sense of openness and accountability in the bureaucracy and to develop a fairly elected and pro-democratic political structure so that citizens could effectively exercise their rights to monitor the government for the consolidation of the concept of 'One Country, Two Systems'.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups. The Journal's web site is located at http://yrc.hkfyg.org.hk/eng/journal.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Youth Studies-
dc.relation.ispartof青年研究學報-
dc.titleA New Direction for Civic Education in Hong Kong SAR-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.hkuros38444-
dc.identifier.volume1-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage151-
dc.identifier.epage158-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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