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Article: Being (im)polite in New Zealand workplaces: Māori and Pākehā leaders

TitleBeing (im)polite in New Zealand workplaces: Māori and Pākehā leaders
Authors
KeywordsCross-cultural interaction
Ethnicity
Humour
Leadership
Workplace discourse
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pragma
Citation
Journal of Pragmatics, 2007, v. 39 n. 4, p. 712-729 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper investigates the ways in which leaders in ethnically diverse workplaces in New Zealand construct themselves as effective leaders in interaction with subordinates, whilst also taking account of the politeness norms of their specific workplaces. Case studies of two leaders, one from a Pākehā and one from a Māori workplace, illustrate that shared ethnic values and attitudes impact on the behaviour of all members of the leaders’ communities of practice. The analysis of meeting openings and the use of contestive humour demonstrate that what is considered appropriate behaviour in one organisational context, and what is perceived as constituting polite behaviour by group members, may be considered inappropriate and even impolite by members of another organisation. By behaving in ways that are in accordance with the norms developed in their ‘ethnicised’ communities of practice, leaders and other organisational members reinforce, maintain and shape these politeness norms.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223793
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.118
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.153

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchnurr, S-
dc.contributor.authorMarra, M-
dc.contributor.authorHolmes, J-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T03:53:20Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-17T03:53:20Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Pragmatics, 2007, v. 39 n. 4, p. 712-729-
dc.identifier.issn0378-2166-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223793-
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates the ways in which leaders in ethnically diverse workplaces in New Zealand construct themselves as effective leaders in interaction with subordinates, whilst also taking account of the politeness norms of their specific workplaces. Case studies of two leaders, one from a Pākehā and one from a Māori workplace, illustrate that shared ethnic values and attitudes impact on the behaviour of all members of the leaders’ communities of practice. The analysis of meeting openings and the use of contestive humour demonstrate that what is considered appropriate behaviour in one organisational context, and what is perceived as constituting polite behaviour by group members, may be considered inappropriate and even impolite by members of another organisation. By behaving in ways that are in accordance with the norms developed in their ‘ethnicised’ communities of practice, leaders and other organisational members reinforce, maintain and shape these politeness norms.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pragma-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pragmatics-
dc.subjectCross-cultural interaction-
dc.subjectEthnicity-
dc.subjectHumour-
dc.subjectLeadership-
dc.subjectWorkplace discourse-
dc.titleBeing (im)polite in New Zealand workplaces: Māori and Pākehā leaders-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSchnurr, S: sschnurr@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pragma.2006.11.016-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33847174941-
dc.identifier.hkuros140505-
dc.identifier.volume39-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage712-
dc.identifier.epage729-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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