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Article: Association between Body Composition and Menstrual Dysfunction in Collegiate Dance Students

TitleAssociation between Body Composition and Menstrual Dysfunction in Collegiate Dance Students
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-JOG.html
Citation
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research, 1997, v. 23 n. 6, p. 529-535 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To evaluate the relationship between body mass index, body fat composition and fat distribution and menstrual dysfunction in collegiate dancing students. Method: A total of 64 dancing students from a collegiate school of dancing were studied; through interview by a structured questionnaire to elicit details of menstrual history, and these were correlated to anthropometric measurements obtained by physical examination. Results: There were 22 ballerinas, 16 classic Chinese dancers, and 26 modern or theatrical dancers. Ten (15.6%) had oligomenorrhoea and 12 (18.7%) had amenorrhoea, with a slight, but statistically non-significant preponderance of ballerinas in the amenorrhoeic group. There was no difference in the body mass index among the eumenorrhoeic, oligomenorrhoeic or amenorrhoeic group, but amenorrhoeic dancers had a significantly lower percentage of total body fat as calculated by a 4 site skinfold thickness formula when compared to eumenorrhoeic ones (15.72% vs 17.95%, p < 0.05). Amenorrhoeic dancers also had lower waist to hip (p < 0.001) and waist to thigh circumference ratios (p < 0.001), indicating that they had more feminine figures favoured aesthetically for dancers. Conclusion: The data suggests that estimation of percentage of body fat gave a better correlation to menstrual status than either weight or body mass index. Thus, proper nutritional advice based on such evaluation should be an essential component in treating menstrual dysfunction in these dancers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223782
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.091
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.521

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTo, WWK-
dc.contributor.authorWong, MWN-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KM-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-15T07:44:08Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-15T07:44:08Z-
dc.date.issued1997-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research, 1997, v. 23 n. 6, p. 529-535-
dc.identifier.issn1341-8076-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223782-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate the relationship between body mass index, body fat composition and fat distribution and menstrual dysfunction in collegiate dancing students. Method: A total of 64 dancing students from a collegiate school of dancing were studied; through interview by a structured questionnaire to elicit details of menstrual history, and these were correlated to anthropometric measurements obtained by physical examination. Results: There were 22 ballerinas, 16 classic Chinese dancers, and 26 modern or theatrical dancers. Ten (15.6%) had oligomenorrhoea and 12 (18.7%) had amenorrhoea, with a slight, but statistically non-significant preponderance of ballerinas in the amenorrhoeic group. There was no difference in the body mass index among the eumenorrhoeic, oligomenorrhoeic or amenorrhoeic group, but amenorrhoeic dancers had a significantly lower percentage of total body fat as calculated by a 4 site skinfold thickness formula when compared to eumenorrhoeic ones (15.72% vs 17.95%, p < 0.05). Amenorrhoeic dancers also had lower waist to hip (p < 0.001) and waist to thigh circumference ratios (p < 0.001), indicating that they had more feminine figures favoured aesthetically for dancers. Conclusion: The data suggests that estimation of percentage of body fat gave a better correlation to menstrual status than either weight or body mass index. Thus, proper nutritional advice based on such evaluation should be an essential component in treating menstrual dysfunction in these dancers.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-JOG.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article]. Authors are not required to remove preprints posted prior to acceptance of the submitted version. Postprint This is the accepted version of the following article: [full citation], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article]. -
dc.subject.meshAmenorrhea - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshBody Composition-
dc.subject.meshBody Constitution-
dc.subject.meshDancing-
dc.subject.meshMenstruation Disturbances - epidemiology - etiology-
dc.titleAssociation between Body Composition and Menstrual Dysfunction in Collegiate Dance Students-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1447-0756.1997.tb00882.x-
dc.identifier.pmid9433044-
dc.identifier.hkuros30240-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage529-
dc.identifier.epage535-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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