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Article: Biology and functional morphology of Myochama anomioides Stutchbury, 1830 (Bivalvia: Anomalodesmata: Pandoroidea), with reference ot cementation

TitleBiology and functional morphology of Myochama anomioides Stutchbury, 1830 (Bivalvia: Anomalodesmata: Pandoroidea), with reference ot cementation
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://mollus.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Journal of Molluscan Studies, 2000, v. 66 n. 3, p. 403-416 How to Cite?
AbstractThe small, exclusively Australasian, anomalodesmatan family Mychamidae comprises only two genera; the shallow-burrowing Myadora and the cementing Myochama. This paper describes the anatomy ad cementing behaviour of Myochama anomioides and draws comparisons with Myadora. The anatomy of Myochama anomioides is little different from that previously described for Myadora, except that they are mirror images. Valve inequality is not reflected in the organs of the mantle cavity in either taxon. Such differences which are present, for example the reduction of the foot in Myochama, mostly relate to the adoption of a sessile habit. There are few idfferences in mantle folds of the cementing and non-cementing genus, except that in M. anomioides the right mantle fold, which secretes the cemented valve, is thicker and less well-developed than the left. During the cementation process, the periostracum secreted by the right fold is thinner and has a quilted appearance. Individuals of Myochama anomioides cement by their right valve once they have recahed a size of 1.2—3.9 mm. They appear to have a preference for attaching to the posterior portions of a diversity of living, shallow infaunal bivalves. The pronounced stereotypic orientation they adopt suggests that these hosts are most often alive at the time of colonization and that the mychamids benefit from the relationship. The relationship, however, is not obligate. They are capable of attaching to other shelly or rock debris, but do so at a lager size, presumaby whe the preferred substrata are not available. The thin layer of extra-periostracal cement lacks the calcereous crystalline nature of oyster cement, instead of being largely composed of organic material. This cement is presumably secreted by glands within the mantle, but these have not been identified. Indeed, the mantle lacks arenophilic glands which might have been thought a suitable candidate for supplying cement.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223780
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.185
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.481

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHarper, EM-
dc.contributor.authorMorton, B-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-15T06:18:22Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-15T06:18:22Z-
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Molluscan Studies, 2000, v. 66 n. 3, p. 403-416-
dc.identifier.issn0260-1230-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223780-
dc.description.abstractThe small, exclusively Australasian, anomalodesmatan family Mychamidae comprises only two genera; the shallow-burrowing Myadora and the cementing Myochama. This paper describes the anatomy ad cementing behaviour of Myochama anomioides and draws comparisons with Myadora. The anatomy of Myochama anomioides is little different from that previously described for Myadora, except that they are mirror images. Valve inequality is not reflected in the organs of the mantle cavity in either taxon. Such differences which are present, for example the reduction of the foot in Myochama, mostly relate to the adoption of a sessile habit. There are few idfferences in mantle folds of the cementing and non-cementing genus, except that in M. anomioides the right mantle fold, which secretes the cemented valve, is thicker and less well-developed than the left. During the cementation process, the periostracum secreted by the right fold is thinner and has a quilted appearance. Individuals of Myochama anomioides cement by their right valve once they have recahed a size of 1.2—3.9 mm. They appear to have a preference for attaching to the posterior portions of a diversity of living, shallow infaunal bivalves. The pronounced stereotypic orientation they adopt suggests that these hosts are most often alive at the time of colonization and that the mychamids benefit from the relationship. The relationship, however, is not obligate. They are capable of attaching to other shelly or rock debris, but do so at a lager size, presumaby whe the preferred substrata are not available. The thin layer of extra-periostracal cement lacks the calcereous crystalline nature of oyster cement, instead of being largely composed of organic material. This cement is presumably secreted by glands within the mantle, but these have not been identified. Indeed, the mantle lacks arenophilic glands which might have been thought a suitable candidate for supplying cement.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://mollus.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Molluscan Studies-
dc.rightsPre-print: Journal Title] ©: [year] [owner as specified on the article] Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of xxxxxx]. All rights reserved. Pre-print (Once an article is published, preprint notice should be amended to): This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the Article as published in the print edition of the Journal.] Post-print: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in [insert journal title] following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [insert complete citation information here] is available online at: xxxxxxx [insert URL that the author will receive upon publication here]. -
dc.titleBiology and functional morphology of Myochama anomioides Stutchbury, 1830 (Bivalvia: Anomalodesmata: Pandoroidea), with reference ot cementation-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHarper, EM: emh21@cus.cam.ac.uk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/mollus/66.3.403-
dc.identifier.hkuros54123-
dc.identifier.volume66-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage403-
dc.identifier.epage416-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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