File Download
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Intellectual styles, learning agility, and personality among university students

TitleIntellectual styles, learning agility, and personality among university students
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Fang, S. [方思琪]. (2015). Intellectual styles, learning agility, and personality among university students. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5703934
AbstractThe present research serves three purposes. First, the primary aim is to investigate the identity of intellectual styles, which comes to the relationships between intellectual styles and learning agility, as well as intellectual styles and personality traits. Second, it examines the reliability and validity of learning agility among university students. Third, it explores the effects of students’ background factors on the intellectual styles, learning agility, and personality. Three hundred and forty-three students from three universities in Guangdong, Shanghai, and Shanxi from Mainland China, responded to the Thinking Styles Inventory RevisedⅡ,the Learning Agility Inventory, and the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Results indicated that significant relationships were obtained among intellectual styles, learning agility, and personality. First, TypeⅠintellectual styles, which are more adaptive and creative, significantly and positively predicted higher scores in learning agility. Second, openness and extraversion were positively related to the more creativity-generating and more complex thinking styles. The more norm-favoring and simplistic thinking styles were positively related to neuroticism. Moreover, conscientiousness was related to all types of the thinking styles. Third, openness, conscientiousness, and extraversion personality traits predicted better outcome in learning agility while agreeableness was negatively related to learning agility. Findings also suggested that the Learning Agility Inventory was valid and reliable among university participants, which means that it is applicable to academic settings. Finally, travel experiences were significant associated with TypeⅠintellectual styles as well as higher scores in learning agility. Implications of these findings were discussed for students, teachers, and researchers.
DegreeMaster of Education
SubjectLearning, Psychology of
Cognitive styles
Dept/ProgramEducation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223643

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFang, Siqi-
dc.contributor.author方思琪-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-03T23:16:58Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-03T23:16:58Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationFang, S. [方思琪]. (2015). Intellectual styles, learning agility, and personality among university students. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5703934-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/223643-
dc.description.abstractThe present research serves three purposes. First, the primary aim is to investigate the identity of intellectual styles, which comes to the relationships between intellectual styles and learning agility, as well as intellectual styles and personality traits. Second, it examines the reliability and validity of learning agility among university students. Third, it explores the effects of students’ background factors on the intellectual styles, learning agility, and personality. Three hundred and forty-three students from three universities in Guangdong, Shanghai, and Shanxi from Mainland China, responded to the Thinking Styles Inventory RevisedⅡ,the Learning Agility Inventory, and the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. Results indicated that significant relationships were obtained among intellectual styles, learning agility, and personality. First, TypeⅠintellectual styles, which are more adaptive and creative, significantly and positively predicted higher scores in learning agility. Second, openness and extraversion were positively related to the more creativity-generating and more complex thinking styles. The more norm-favoring and simplistic thinking styles were positively related to neuroticism. Moreover, conscientiousness was related to all types of the thinking styles. Third, openness, conscientiousness, and extraversion personality traits predicted better outcome in learning agility while agreeableness was negatively related to learning agility. Findings also suggested that the Learning Agility Inventory was valid and reliable among university participants, which means that it is applicable to academic settings. Finally, travel experiences were significant associated with TypeⅠintellectual styles as well as higher scores in learning agility. Implications of these findings were discussed for students, teachers, and researchers.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshLearning, Psychology of-
dc.subject.lcshCognitive styles-
dc.titleIntellectual styles, learning agility, and personality among university students-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5703934-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Education-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducation-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats